Author Topic: Health hazards of hosepipes  (Read 1096 times)

Offline Pitlamp

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Health hazards of hosepipes
« on: June 16, 2017, 05:27:12 pm »
http://www.aol.co.uk/travel/2017/06/16/granddad-killed-legionnaires-disease-garden-hose/?ncid=newsltuknew00000001

In all seriousness, this is something every caver who contemplates setting a siphon going should be aware of.

Offline steviet_scg

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2017, 11:43:19 pm »
Legionellae tend only to grow at temperatures between 25C and 45C - the risk in an underground UK site is therefore likely to be minimal.

A surface siphon - yes, certainly something to consider.
Steve

Offline Pitlamp

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2017, 08:25:10 am »
I suspect the problem could arise if you keep a length of hose in the shed (particularly in summer) then take it underground to use on a project. In future, in that scenario, I think I'd be tempted to run some Domestos through it before use, as a basic precaution.

Just thought this was something cavers might at least like to be aware of as a possible hazard.

Online Ed

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2017, 09:06:31 am »
More at risk from cryptosporidiosis

Offline shotlighter

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2017, 11:51:53 am »
Never mind siphons, a greater risk is hosing off or pressure washing kit. Dont forget, the main route of infection is inhaling airborne droplets.

Offline Pitlamp

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2017, 06:29:49 pm »
Or Leptospirosis, as I know to my cost from 2014 . . . . .

Offline mulucaver

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2017, 10:25:39 pm »
Never mind siphons, a greater risk is hosing off or pressure washing kit. Dont forget, the main route of infection is inhaling airborne droplets.
This happened to me 2 years ago after a big flood at my home in Sarawak. I nearly died.
Dave Clucas
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Offline shotlighter

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2017, 10:48:06 pm »
Never mind siphons, a greater risk is hosing off or pressure washing kit. Dont forget, the main route of infection is inhaling airborne droplets.
This happened to me 2 years ago after a big flood at my home in Sarawak. I nearly died.
It wasn't legionella but a few years back, I got a dreadful chest infection in similar circumstances. Felt like poo, took a month off work  & 3 courses of antibiotics to shift it. All thanks to pressure washing the patio.
Simple paper dust mask would have probably prevented it.
Take care! 

Offline adrian paniwnyk

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2017, 09:00:55 pm »
Maybe putting the hose in a bucket of water and Milton might do.

Offline pwhole

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2017, 09:13:08 pm »
The car-washing stations that use pressure-washers must be a public health hazard too - I always cross the road if I'm near one. Imagine a car has been to a farmyard and has cowshit all over it - these guys then blast it into the street at high velocity as a fine aerosol so that everyone can breathe it in. Yum.

Offline Pitlamp

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #10 on: June 19, 2017, 07:57:50 am »
My conscience is clear on that one; the motor never gets washed.

Offline Bob Mehew

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2017, 05:36:29 pm »
Maybe putting the hose in a bucket of water and Milton might do.
Doubt it,  See page 69 in https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/585109/Management_of_Spa_Pools_controlling_the_risk_oof_infections_Part_2.pdf which implies moderate strength sodium hypochlorite solution is required.  Storing the hose pipe dry is a simpler solution or substantial flushing (with care) should take care of the problem.

Online cavemanmike

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #12 on: June 20, 2017, 08:32:03 am »
Similar problem with your hydration pack if your not carefully

Offline ALEXW

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #13 on: June 21, 2017, 03:52:02 pm »
Anything with a moist bladder, ("oo er missus") Bag pipes and diving gear (ABLJ or stab jacket) are both known to have made people ill.

Offline Pitlamp

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #14 on: June 21, 2017, 04:36:20 pm »
Very true, that's why there are standard procedures for managing rebreather counterlung hygiene. In the case of hose pipes, they're quite difficult to dry out the inside as residual water collects in the bottom of the coils. A good blast through of compressed air (e.g. from a diving cylinder) goes a long way towards removing much of this water. But if planning to start a siphon by sucking on a hosepipe it's probably worth considering the use of a disinfectant first. Starting it by pouring water into the upstream end continuously via a funnel is safer and, in my experience, actually more effective.

Offline Bob Mehew

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Re: Health hazards of hosepipes
« Reply #15 on: June 21, 2017, 06:50:22 pm »
Starting it by pouring water into the upstream end continuously via a funnel is safer and, in my experience, actually more effective.
Even more effective is a venturi device attached to the high point of the syphon with both ends of the syphon normally kept under water.  When the syphon breaks and reseals at both ends, the venturi sucks the air out and restarts the syphon.  It has worked fairly reliably at ANUS for over thirty years.  It does need a near by flowing stream to supply the venturi device though.