Author Topic: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5  (Read 1687 times)

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #25 on: April 12, 2018, 11:00:43 am »
With programme Auto shots I use my Scurion headlamp a lot. I think a bit of background lighting can balance the composition and it does not matter if its out of focus.

30,000 year old cryogenic stal in The Frozen Deep.



This view gives you a diagonal rule of thirds ( ish ) and takes away the unbalanced view of the thirds line in the middle. It also draws the eye down to the human subject. A black background will also give a perception of image clarity.


Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #26 on: April 12, 2018, 11:25:21 am »
Macro/Microscope. The TG Series sensor will give you reasonable macro shots but you have to get exceptionally close to your subject. The image you get will have focus fall off near the edges so allow for that in the composed image and crop it out. A black background will give an illusion of sharpness.

Bortyoidal stalagmites with TG 2 on Macro. Of course the depth of field will be tiny so sometimes its easier to take a normal high res image and crop in.





More fun. Can you see what I have done here ?

Macro Mirror Image.



You can get a " ring flash " for the TG Series but its not true in the usual sense as its a prism that reflects the cameras own flash to a ring clipped on the the lens. I have found it difficult but others might like it. I normally use I Auto with a helmet light from the side.




Offline flashmonkey

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #27 on: April 12, 2018, 12:00:46 pm »
Thank you the old ruminator I will have to try some of these methods

Offline pwhole

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #28 on: April 12, 2018, 03:38:20 pm »
There are programs out there that will let you do 'Focus Blending', which will take a stack of (tripod-mounted) photos of the same subject, but all taken with different focal points. giving massive depth-of-field for a close-up subject. This is akin to the front/backplate manipulation of a large-format camera utilising the 'Scheimpflug principle':

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheimpflug_principle

It allows photos like this to be produced, and would work great on tiny cave formations like those shown above.

Offline Fulk

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #29 on: April 13, 2018, 12:29:39 pm »
Two days before going on a caving trip to Hungary, we decided to buy an Olympus TG 5 . . . we really should have bought it sooner and given ourselves time to practise with it. I took a few snaps round the house and garden the day we bought it, and was quite pleased with the quality of the results.
Our first trip in Hungary was to Matyas Hegyi Barlang, part of the show cave that runs under Budapest.
We tried taking pictures by caving light on the P(rogramme) setting, with some modest degree of success; my lamp has both spot and diffuse settings, and on the spot the colours went a bit to pot, being somewhat of a yellowish hue. On the diffuse setting, however, the pictures came out more as expected, with a sort of brownish hue (plus, of course, they were more evenly lit).
Our second caving trip was to Pal-Volgyi Barlang, which is another part of the same cave – but with bigger passages and less strenuous. We tried the same technique as before for our photography, again with modest results.
A day or two later we set off for the Bükki Mountains, where we stayed in a caving club hut. It’s quite a nice hut (notwithstanding the lack of running water and electricity), in the middle of a forest in the middle of nowhere, with a splendid long-drop khazi out back (bats for boys, hearts for girls).
In the hut we started to faff with the camera, to try and discover some way of setting off remote flashes; we found that by taping red insulating tape over the camera’s built-in flash, we could fire remote guns with a minimum of foreground lighting. The camera has an aperture-priority setting, but it is restricted to just three f-stops – f/2, f/2.8 and f/8 – so to get the correct exposure involved a bit of faffing, setting off aperture against ISO setting.
Our third trip was to Ariadne Cave, which is situated a few miles to the NW of Budapest, where we tried the technique outlined above.
When we got home we made a little open-sided cardboard box with a hole cut in it, and covered the hole with two layers of ‘infra-red filter’ (old film, not exposed but developed) such that when slipped over the camera the IR filter covered the built-in flash. This then fired off-camera flash(es) in synchronization. It sounds naff . . . it looks naff . . . but it works! To focus, we relied on the camera’s auto-focus mechanism with a caving light trained on the subject, in the hope that the flash would overpower the ‘available light’.

Conclusions

We have an A4 printer, so I decided to pick a couple of ‘portrait’ images shot above ground in good lighting, cut out the central sections of them, and print these sections up at A4 – thus giving the equivalent of A3 prints. The results were, in my opinion, excellent – especially when you consider that the camera is, when all is said and done, a point-&-shoot compact (albeit quite a sophisticated one).
So far we’ve made small prints and A4s, plus we’ve included quite a few (up to ~A4) in a Photobook. The TG 5 gives good, clear pictures, with excellent colour rendition. The current screen-saver on my computer is a cropped ~18.75" × 10.5" (equivalent to a 18.75" × 14.1") picture taken underground on the TG 5, with a minimum amount of ‘tweaking’ (minor changes to shadows and highlights, plus a modest degree of sharpening), and it looks fine at this scale, even when seen quite close up.
One limitation of the camera for underground use is the limited range of f-stops; another is the lack of a ‘B’ setting – though I guess to some extent the live composite setting could be used as a quasi-B setting?


« Last Edit: April 13, 2018, 12:42:31 pm by Fulk »

Offline Fulk

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #30 on: April 13, 2018, 12:31:12 pm »
Rats; I tried to post a whole bunch of snaps, but only one has appeared! So, I'll try again.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2018, 12:43:01 pm by Fulk »

Offline Fulk

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #31 on: April 13, 2018, 12:32:23 pm »
It looks as though I can only post one snap at a time:
« Last Edit: April 13, 2018, 12:43:14 pm by Fulk »

Offline Fulk

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #32 on: April 13, 2018, 12:33:48 pm »
And another TWO – wow

Offline Fulk

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #33 on: April 13, 2018, 12:35:12 pm »
And more

Offline Fulk

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #34 on: April 13, 2018, 12:36:26 pm »
Some more

Offline Fulk

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #35 on: April 13, 2018, 12:37:58 pm »
And more

Offline Fulk

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #36 on: April 13, 2018, 12:41:13 pm »
And two more

Offline flashmonkey

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #37 on: April 15, 2018, 08:26:28 pm »
Hiya everyone I took these in cwmorthin on Sat after about 20mins playing with 3 flash guns what do you guys think. Again thank you chunky for your help

Offline royfellows

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #38 on: April 16, 2018, 09:56:05 am »
I did a bit of messing about with the XP 120 and the Imolent DX 800 over weekend. I made a diffuser up for the torch and tried it in a mine I was working in. Disappointed with the results. I had the old issue from way back of finding somewhere to place the torch, could not, so ended up walking in front of the camera on a tripod holding the torch. I get the impression that the camera needs light to get started for some reason, I was trying to set it up on the self timer. Found it very fumbly, and lack of viewfinder meant I need my reading glasses to do anything.

Now I also have bought a Sony H400. This piece of kit really rocks. But yet to try it underground. Only criticism is that on the manual shooting I could not find the shutter speed setting. F stop is obvious as it says "F" then the number, but shutter speed is just a number and no "S" in front of it to tell you what it is. Apart from that, as I said it rocks. Best thing I have bought in ages.
A lot of mines are walk in with the odd scramble, so can get away carrying kit like that. I have ordered  a waterproof hard shoulder bag for it.

Later in the year though I want to try and get to western Cwffty by way of Parc Lead Mine, chest deep ochre and wet ladderways. No photographs since the 1990s, so if I can master the XP 120 there is a good mission for it. I think patience a vital ingredient.
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Offline pwhole

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #39 on: April 16, 2018, 11:36:56 am »
Those photography bean bags might be a handy way of positioning a torch? I've got one with a male tripod stud in it, so the camera can be screwed on, but I think 'blank' bags are also available, so you can just stuff it on a handy ledge.

Offline royfellows

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Re: Taking pics with the olympus tough tg 5
« Reply #40 on: April 16, 2018, 12:00:28 pm »
I have a load of GoPro kit I distribute with my new Scorpion lamps and will make up a torch on tripod mount.

One thing I find with these new cameras is a pitfall in the setup.
On the old S9600 there is a setting for "Quality" , the camera is 9 MP and the settings are marked in numbers up to "9M", so I knew what I was looking at. On the new ones its "Size" and in the guide it bangs about printing sizes, the 'hint' about what its really talking about is brief mention of the word "Quality". It was only after thinking about it that I realised what I was looking at.  Setting it to "Large" for the full MP I still get hundreds of frames on the 32 gig SD card. On the Sony "L" is default setting, the XP was smaller.
I sometimes open a photo on my 24 inch computer screen and zoom in to some tiny detail, that is where it shows. I want to be able to see the detail not a lot of blurred squares.

I would say that looking at things overall, the Sony is a professional camera. Its is OK for snappers though, but has the features that somebody like me needs.
I will persevere with the XP, but even outdoors it is very fumbly. Its not until you handle something like the Sony you realise all this.

I am sorry if going off original thread.
"You are not consumers, you are the product" Google and Facebook, 'Masters of the Universe'