Author Topic: BCA no longer recognised in Cornwall  (Read 3008 times)

Offline Fulk

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Re: BCA no longer recognised in Cornwall
« Reply #25 on: March 23, 2017, 11:12:14 pm »
Quote
Sorry I picked a date at random as I was at work and too busy to check it.

Dear Alex, when langcliffe posted about what it was like in the 1400s, I suspect that he knew what he what talking about, but was too modest to say so, and didn't need to go and check it.

Offline rhychydwr1

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Re: BCA no longer recognised in Cornwall
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2017, 10:18:47 am »

THE CORNISH LANGUAGE

Sir Walter Scott wrote:
“By Tre, Pol and Pen you shall know all true Cornishmen.”

Tony Oldham wrote:
“By Tre, Pwll and Pen you shall know all true Welshmen.”

Both version mean: Town, Pool and Head [of a hill]

Cornish is very similar to Welsh and as a Welsh learner I was pleasantly surprised to find that I could recognise Cornish words like Aberplymm for Plymouth.  Aber being the estuary or mouth of a river.  Poldhu, means "black pool”.  The Welsh is Pwllddu.

http://www.omniglot.com/writing/cornish.htm
accessed 041013  “Cornish (Kernewek/Kernowek/Kernuak/Curnoack).
“Cornish is a Celtic language closely related to Breton and Welsh spoken mainly in Cornwall (Kernow) and also by a few people in Australia and the USA. There are currently about 300 fluent speakers and many more people have some knowledge of the language.”


History

Cornish started to diverge from Welsh towards the end of the 7th century AD and the earliest known examples of written Cornish date from the end of the 9th century AD. These were in the form of glosses scribbled in the margins of a Latin text - Smaragdus' Commentary on Donatus. They were originally thought to be in Old Breton, but Prof. J. Loth showed in 1907 that they were in fact Old Cornish. Old Breton and Old Cornish were very similar and are easily confused.

Old Cornish was used from about 800-1250 AD and traces of it also survive in some place names in eastern Cornwall. The Cornish used between 1250 and 1550 is known as Middle or Medieval Cornish and quite a lot of literature from this period still survives, including religious plays, poems and sermons. Literature in Late or Modern Cornish, the type of Cornish used between 1550 and the end of the 19th century, includes folk tales, poems, songs, and translations from the Bible. At the end of the 19th century Cornish disappeared from everyday use and the last native speaker was probably John Davey of Zennor who died in 1891”

There is more about the last Cornish speaker, Dolly Pentreath, under Mousehole.

Then another source suggests the last Cornish speaker died in 1778. Reference:
REFORMATION TO INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION by Christopher Hill  Vol 2 1530-1780 [in the series] The Pelican Economic History of Britain reprinted 1983 page 282.

Offline Simon Wilson

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Re: BCA no longer recognised in Cornwall
« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2017, 04:16:44 pm »
Pen Y Ghent - 'Hill [which is] the boundary' in Cumbric.

Cumbric was a variety of the Common Brittonic language spoken during the Early Middle Ages in the Hen Ogledd or "Old North" in what is now Northern England and southern Lowland Scotland. It was closely related to Old Welsh and the other Brittonic languages. Place name evidence suggests Cumbric may also have been spoken as far south as Pendle and the Yorkshire Dales.

http://www.old-north.co.uk/lang_intro.html


Offline langcliffe

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Re: BCA no longer recognised in Cornwall
« Reply #28 on: March 24, 2017, 04:26:02 pm »
Dear Alex, when langcliffe posted about what it was like in the 1400s, I suspect that he knew what he what talking about, but was too modest to say so, and didn't need to go and check it.

I suspect that Alex was momentarily confusing Medieval Britain with Dark Age Britain. If he had gone back yet another 600 years he would have been absolutely correct.

Offline Cartwright26

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Re: BCA no longer recognised in Cornwall
« Reply #29 on: August 10, 2017, 09:09:08 pm »
Whilst i do agree with eberything being bolted and locked especially mines unless for public safety but thays a fairly stupid post in regards to cutting locks..... how to you suppose we stop local kids wandering into a cave thats next to the road? A cave with formations that would be destroyed by people that do not have prior knowledge or respect for underground? Now one of devons caves has had its locks cut twice this month and a show cave broken into and priceless fossils stolen!! So way to go for encouraging that!
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Offline Disgusted from Cornwall.

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Re: BCA no longer recognised in Cornwall
« Reply #30 on: August 11, 2017, 12:19:13 pm »
Did I hear that DGC is going to have a camera put on it. That would be hilarious fun.

RIP Jeremy Beadle.

Offline Cartwright26

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Re: BCA no longer recognised in Cornwall
« Reply #31 on: August 11, 2017, 12:27:28 pm »
The land owner already has cctv covering his land.... not sure who DGC is stu but itll be great when somebody is prosecuted for criminal damage and trespass reckin thatll be a cracking jeremy beadle moment
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Offline Cartwright26

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Re: BCA no longer recognised in Cornwall
« Reply #32 on: August 11, 2017, 02:46:08 pm »
Just realised you meant devon great consols..... im guessing you mean in particular wheal fanny..... everybody knows who picks and cuts that lock! He has been seen to do it several times.... to be fair i think the reason there is a lock on that one is to keep the public from plumeting down the pitches as its a busy woods.... i could be wrong on that as i dont tend to go down as many mines as i do caves
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