Author Topic: Juniper Gulf sump  (Read 970 times)

Offline Jon

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Juniper Gulf sump
« on: December 12, 2018, 10:23:12 pm »
Does anyone know where the Juniper Gulf sump connects to?

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Offline Fulk

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Re: Juniper Gulf sump
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2018, 11:17:16 pm »
Austwick Beck Head (?)

Offline langcliffe

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Re: Juniper Gulf sump
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2018, 11:20:33 pm »

Offline Pitlamp

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Re: Juniper Gulf sump
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2018, 02:56:01 pm »
. . . and just possibly it overflows to Blind Beck Cave, in uber-flood?

Offline Fulk

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Re: Juniper Gulf sump
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2018, 04:57:53 pm »
Over in Ribblesdale? . . . That would be quite something!

Offline Pitlamp

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Re: Juniper Gulf sump
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2018, 05:36:31 pm »
The overflow to Ribblesdale has been hypothesised for some time. To my knowledge no-one's ever got any dye through. But anyone who has ever been inside the short cave at Austwick Beck Head will have realised just how immature the passage is and perhaps pondered on whether some of the water from the many magnificent Allotment potholes also goes somewhere else.

The regional dip is to the north east. The Sulber fault is in that direction from Juniper Gulf etc. It's understandable that the excess floodwater may then go along this fault, which passes relatively close to Blind Beck Cave. The latter suddenly produces a very significant flow in very wet conditions, consistent with it acting as an overflow for a major system.

All the above evidence is circumstantial of course - but you can see how it might easily be possible. An analogous situation occurs in the Peak Cavern system (Derbyshire). The normal flow in Speedwell Cavern drains to Russet Well and Slop Moll. In flood it overflows via Treasury Chamber (and other routes) so the excess water then comes out to daylight via Peak Cavern, a completely different underground route. Another example (nearer home in the Dales) is Sleets Gill, where normal flow drains to Moss Beck and floodwater overflows via the main cave entrance, which is a considerable distance away.  Underground "distributaries" are't particularly uncommon.

Offline psychocrawler

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Re: Juniper Gulf sump
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2018, 07:11:32 pm »
Possibly even more likely that Nick Pot and Hangman's Hole and Sulber Pot overflow in flood along the Sulber fault (they are on it). This is one reason why I dived the 'static' sump in Nick Pot hoping like all other contenders for an easy win. No such luck of course but wide open if you like diving in a total silt out. Needs a better diver than me!

Juniper Gulf was also on my list (much bigger sump pool and much easier kit up) but somebody else was rumoured to be diving there at the time so I went for Nick Pot instead. I even had the late, great Watty as sherpa support supreme but even his 'golden touch' failed that day.

Offline Jon

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Re: Juniper Gulf sump
« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2018, 08:21:06 pm »
Thanks for the info.

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Offline CPC John

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Re: Juniper Gulf sump
« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2018, 08:10:04 pm »
These drainage systems that go through current day ‘water sheds’ (and there are a number in the Dales) must surely be due to basement topography?
The sooner we map the base limestone palaeo land surface the sooner we’ll find the master caves running along pre Carboniferous valleys.....