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Standing stones in grykes around Ingleborough

Pitlamp

Well-known member
Thanks AndyS - yes, I think they're mentioned in the presentation, as are others overseas elsewhere. Information about similar features in other areas helps provide context.

The study so far has focussed on Ingleborough and Scales Moor but I think the team are interested in extending the work beyond here, so any knowledge of similar miniliths elsewhere in the Dales (or even further afield in northern England) would be useful.
 

adep

Member
braveduck said:
Ha Ha ,sorry to disappoint all those historians out there ,but now that the perpetrator is no longer with  us
the story can be told . One afternoons work by idle hands with nothing else to do !Personal information
told to me by the perpetrator . Done  sometime in the 1960s I believe .

Oops!
 

scoutgreen

New member
There are plenty on the Burren in Co Clare. An archaeologist said it was mystery and must relate to some ancient cultural significance. When I suggested the shards had been set on end in grykes by bored shepherds he was not impressed.
 

braveduck

Member
There are plenty on the Burren in Co Clare. An archaeologist said it was mystery and must relate to some ancient cultural significance. When I suggested the shards had been set on end in grykes by bored shepherds he was not impressed.
The cultural significance is ,a dinnertime spent in the pub ,and then an afternoon with nothing else to do !
 

ZombieCake

Active member
Maybe a bit of overkill for the situation up North, however, you don't need an army of ancient slaves, passing UFOs, lots of spinach, or proton energy pills, to shift massive blocks on your own:

 
That's rather impressive. Reminds me of one of my best friends whose memorial service I attended yesterday - Bob Treadgold, caver in the 70s, very good engineer and one of the nicest people I've ever met. Professionally, he had a huge reputation. His non-professional engineering legacy included a series of remarkable cars/bikes and a spud gun with a range of about 400m powered by Elnette (hair spray). His social and family legacies were immense.
 

Pitlamp

Well-known member
I was chatting to someone from near Carlisle the other day and she told me these things exist in reasonable numbers on pavements in the northern part of the "Cumbrian Ring" limestone outcrop (around the Lake District).
 

braveduck

Member
I was chatting to someone from near Carlisle the other day and she told me these things exist in reasonable numbers on pavements in the northern part of the "Cumbrian Ring" limestone outcrop (around the Lake District).
Idle hands travel all over the place .
 

droid

Active member
Maybe Braveduck would be better communicating his scepticism to the researchers.

After all, fake stone settings aren't exactly unknown to professional archaeologists....
 

grahams

Active member
Surely, if miniliths are ancient, you'd expect to find them in similar areas to stone circles? There are no miniliths to my knowledge on Askham Fell, Knipe Scar, the Orton Fells or the Stennerskeugh Clouds to name but a few. All these areas have neolithic stone circles and lots of the white stuff.
I'm with Braveduck on this, especially as one of the Scales Moor miniliths is mine, placed for photographic purposes.
 

alanw

Active member

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