Ladies wellies

topcat

Member
I find certain wellies have far better grip than boots I've tried (seems to be a result of more flexible sole giving greater surface area on the rocks)
Can be true, but there are boots and there are boots.....as indeed there are different wellies , both in terms of flexibility and type of rubber.
Each to his own. I used to wear wellies, and maybe in some parts of the country they can keep your feet dry and then it would be worth putting up with the negatives .
 

Ian Ball

Well-known member
Probably look at kids wellies :)

I wear the Etche wellies and I think they are superb for caving in the dales. I have considered the addition of an insole and always not bothered.
The sizing is a bit annoying but I don't think they will solve the problem of either girls with big calves or girls with very slight calves.

I think that the best approach is a varied kit that is adapted to the environment your using. Hiking boots on a trip through Bar Pot to the main chamber and out is nice, but a trip through Mud Hensler's I'd prefer wellies.
 

Keris82

Member
Speak to Tony

I may well do that
 

pwhole

Well-known member
Incidentally, after that mention of shin-protection earlier - I think I'm the only caver in the UK to wear shinpads - or at least I've never seen anyone else do it, which seems a bit odd, given the preponderance of other pads and the importance of shins for motion (especially prussicking out), but there you go. Anyway, you can pick them up for a fiver at Decathlon or similar stores in the footie/rugby aisles, and they have the added bonus of filling in some empty space in your wellies, so less water gets in. After having several boulder accidents over the years, I can honestly say it's the most cost-effective bit of kit I own, and I'm genuinely apprehensive on the rare trip where I forgot to bring them.
 

Keris82

Member
Incidentally, after that mention of shin-protection earlier - I think I'm the only caver in the UK to wear shinpads - or at least I've never seen anyone else do it, which seems a bit odd, given the preponderance of other pads and the importance of shins for motion (especially prussicking out), but there you go. Anyway, you can pick them up for a fiver at Decathlon or similar stores in the footie/rugby aisles, and they have the added bonus of filling in some empty space in your wellies, so less water gets in. After having several boulder accidents over the years, I can honestly say it's the most cost-effective bit of kit I own, and I'm genuinely apprehensive on the rare trip where I forgot to bring them.
Mr Fairman uses them too!
 

hannahb

Active member
How did you get on @Keris82 ?

I wear the cheapo junior Dunlop's from Inglesport and elsewhere - current model is black with a yellow sole.

They are frustratingly narrow for the shoe size - I often have a real struggle getting them off after a trip. So I'm always looking for something a bit better, but every time I look I end up going back to those.

In my experience rubber-soled wellies have much better grip on rock than plastic/PVC. Something to watch out for. They wear out quickly, much like approach shoes do on tarmac, but that's because they're designed to be grippy.

Do let us know if you buy some new ones and road test them :)
 

JoshW

Active member
Incidentally, after that mention of shin-protection earlier - I think I'm the only caver in the UK to wear shinpads - or at least I've never seen anyone else do it, which seems a bit odd, given the preponderance of other pads and the importance of shins for motion (especially prussicking out), but there you go. Anyway, you can pick them up for a fiver at Decathlon or similar stores in the footie/rugby aisles, and they have the added bonus of filling in some empty space in your wellies, so less water gets in. After having several boulder accidents over the years, I can honestly say it's the most cost-effective bit of kit I own, and I'm genuinely apprehensive on the rare trip where I forgot to bring them.
I wear long neoprene socks and find that that in conjunction with thermals and a furry offers enough padding for normal caving, so only feel big hits.
 

pwhole

Well-known member
I wear long neoprene socks and find that that in conjunction with thermals and a furry offers enough padding for normal caving, so only feel big hits.
One of my colleagues once accidentally rolled a football-sized lump of rock down a steep 4m slope and it hit my leg firmly in the middle, and just bounced off. His face! But yes, that would have splintered it if I hadn't had the shinpads on. They give me the confidence to try sketchy stuff without pain, and they're so cheap it's not worth worrying about. Wear them for work too, if it's on steel.

Just searched for Dunlop safety wellies on Screwfix with a size 5 filter, and there's loads - even have six models in size 4.
 

Huge

Member
Incidentally, after that mention of shin-protection earlier - I think I'm the only caver in the UK to wear shinpads - or at least I've never seen anyone else do it, which seems a bit odd, given the preponderance of other pads and the importance of shins for motion (especially prussicking out), but there you go. Anyway, you can pick them up for a fiver at Decathlon or similar stores in the footie/rugby aisles, and they have the added bonus of filling in some empty space in your wellies, so less water gets in. After having several boulder accidents over the years, I can honestly say it's the most cost-effective bit of kit I own, and I'm genuinely apprehensive on the rare trip where I forgot to bring them.
I know someone who always used shinpads while caving, maybe still does. I never have but then I've got a permanent scar on my left shin, where I whacked it on a boulder and cut it and did the same thing, in the same spot a fortnight later! The flesh feels thin over the bone at the scar, like part is missing!
 

pwhole

Well-known member
It probably is missing! Sadly the shinpads didn't protect me when I stepped backwards in bare feet onto a steel pear krab on a concrete floor, and broke my little toe bone halfway down my foot. Though I still did a six-hour caving trip before I realised it was probably worse than I thought and went to hospital. So much for midsole protection! That took about a year before it was fully healed, and it still hurts occasionally when I do SRT, four years later. So if it ain't broke, make sure it stays that way ;)
 

Andrew N

Member
It probably is missing! Sadly the shinpads didn't protect me when I stepped backwards in bare feet onto a steel pear krab on a concrete floor, and broke my little toe bone halfway down my foot. Though I still did a six-hour caving trip before I realised it was probably worse than I thought and went to hospital. So much for midsole protection! That took about a year before it was fully healed, and it still hurts occasionally when I do SRT, four years later. So if it ain't broke, make sure it stays that way ;)
An interesting take on injuring yourself "while caving" eh! So far, my only caving injury is pulling a muscle in my thumb (I could barely move it for days!) while taking a wetsock off.
 

Keris82

Member
How did you get on @Keris82 ?

I wear the cheapo junior Dunlop's from Inglesport and elsewhere - current model is black with a yellow sole.

They are frustratingly narrow for the shoe size - I often have a real struggle getting them off after a trip. So I'm always looking for something a bit better, but every time I look I end up going back to those.

In my experience rubber-soled wellies have much better grip on rock than plastic/PVC. Something to watch out for. They wear out quickly, much like approach shoes do on tarmac, but that's because they're designed to be grippy.

Do let us know if you buy some new ones and road test them :)
I haven't bought any yet. I'm going to try the etche ones from Mr Seddon but won't get them until the end of June.

I usually buy the same Dunlop ones too but have to size up and wear neoprene socks and a pair of woollen socks for warmth over the top too
 

moletta

Member
Can't fault trad. black Dunlops
I do need room for calves and have small feet. My Dunlops lasted for ages and were good to climb in. I can only recommend trying a few pairs on with your version of caving socks. If they fit grit your teeth and buy them - although mine were not too expensive from an old fashioned shoe shop
 

moletta

Member
Have to say I can relate to hannahb's experience of working hard to get them off but have always blamed my choice of socks. The bonus is they don't slip and cause blisters and are secure when climbing
 

paul

Moderator
I found getting wellies off a pain so years ago started drilling a small hole in the arch area on the side of each welly and that allows air in as I pull my foot out and makes it easy. Yes, water gets in, but I don't wear wellies to keep my feet dry - the water gets in anyway via the tops and I wear wetsuit socks anyway. The small holes in the wellies allow the water to quickly drain as well so I don't have to bother trying to tip the water out if it does get in..
 

Rachel

Member
If you're in the Dales, it's worth trying Settle Coal. They have a lot of wellies/overalls aimed at famers and their kids so have a decent range of sizes rather than just men's sizes.
 
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