Author Topic: Fibonacci sequence  (Read 1671 times)

Online Mrs Trellis

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #50 on: October 01, 2020, 10:31:13 am »
If you count on your fingers you get to a full set of fingers which is 10. You then start with a new set of fingers and remember 'I've already counted 1 ten'. That is base 10.

That's why they use base 12 in Norfolk.
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Offline yrammy

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #51 on: October 01, 2020, 10:31:43 am »
What have I started!

Offline kay

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #52 on: October 01, 2020, 10:45:59 am »
But even so, how meaningful is it to take a single number, or even two numbers, and say "this is a part of THIS sequence"?

But I suspect it all originates with a desire to find a divine order to things (or even any order).

I agree. I think Fibonacci has so many myths because it's too pretty not to be true! The Fibonacci sequence and the Golden Ratio are like catnip for maths teachers who are desperately trying to make things interesting for a classroom full of bored kids. I don't know why my maths teachers didn't just say that maths underpins the whole global economy as well as science, instead of making dodgy links to spirals and flowers.

Today's kids are lucky! We never got anywhere near Fibonacci in the classroom. It was all firmly in the domain of "recreational maths", martin gardner etc.

Quote
P.S. Why did my maths teachers never mention the fact that you can make lots of money out of maths? I get that they are more interested in the beauty of nature and it's mathematical patterns, but to a bunch of teenagers thinking about career options, why not mention this?

Interesting conversation with my son "I don't want to go to uni because I don't know what I want to do yet, and I don't want to spend 3 years studying only to realise that I don't want to do that job" "So why don't you do a maths degree?" "Would anybody employ me with a maths degree?" I understand the desire to get kids to think about their future in terms of studying subjects that will lead to a career, but there are some areas where it has gone too far. State school careers advice is leaning too far to the vocational.

Online Mrs Trellis

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #53 on: October 01, 2020, 10:57:58 am »
What have I started!

In these dark times a bit of light relief is needed.
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Offline Speleotron

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #54 on: October 01, 2020, 12:38:20 pm »
I like this thread and it shows what a good forum this is that we're on page 3 and it hasn't become an argument!
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Offline pwhole

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #55 on: October 01, 2020, 01:17:04 pm »
'Recreational maths' - I love that term. I've done plenty of that ;)

With reference to geology, self-similarity is certainly present, especially at erosional boundaries, coastlines etc. And formulas can predict detail levels of those I guess:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-similarity

Online JoshW

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #56 on: October 01, 2020, 02:08:25 pm »

Quote
P.S. Why did my maths teachers never mention the fact that you can make lots of money out of maths? I get that they are more interested in the beauty of nature and it's mathematical patterns, but to a bunch of teenagers thinking about career options, why not mention this?

Interesting conversation with my son "I don't want to go to uni because I don't know what I want to do yet, and I don't want to spend 3 years studying only to realise that I don't want to do that job" "So why don't you do a maths degree?" "Would anybody employ me with a maths degree?" I understand the desire to get kids to think about their future in terms of studying subjects that will lead to a career, but there are some areas where it has gone too far. State school careers advice is leaning too far to the vocational.

I think that too many jobs now have a requirement for degrees when realistically it just doesn't need it. My job for instance could be done by any old monkey who can use a keyboard and string a sentence together and yet every entry job level in the industry will have a degree as a requirement. I managed to get in without having completed my degree and despite laziness am fairly successful.

Two wasted years at university, and a whoooole load of money. I think that employers need to reduce their requirements for jobs, or be required to take on a certain amount of people without degrees.

Offline ChrisJC

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #57 on: October 01, 2020, 03:09:22 pm »
Interesting conversation with my son "I don't want to go to uni because I don't know what I want to do yet, ...

Suggest they do a 'proper' degree in a subject they find interesting. Perhaps it would lead to an interesting career.

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Online JoshW

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #58 on: October 01, 2020, 03:10:41 pm »
Interesting conversation with my son "I don't want to go to uni because I don't know what I want to do yet, ...

Suggest they do a 'proper' degree in a subject they find interesting. Perhaps it would lead to an interesting career.

Chris.

This this this. do something that is going to hold their interest for 3 years plus (if they want to go to uni at all)

Online mikem

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #59 on: October 01, 2020, 04:12:44 pm »
Degrees have become a requirement mainly to reduce the number of applications that employers have to wade through.

On knuckles - you have 3 on each finger & 2 on the thumb, so 14, but it's quite difficult to maintain 14 different positions to make use of them!

Offline Boy Engineer

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #60 on: October 01, 2020, 04:39:18 pm »
'Recreational maths' - I love that term. I've done plenty of that ;)

With reference to geology, self-similarity is certainly present, especially at erosional boundaries, coastlines etc. And formulas can predict detail levels of those I guess:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-similarity

Please don’t post any more interesting links. That’s going to be another evening gone and I’ve got a lot on already. It’s like UKC meets U3A :)
And I thought an interest in self-similarity was the reason folk put their phone on a stick, albeit in front of something more interesting still.

Online JoshW

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #61 on: October 01, 2020, 04:48:25 pm »
Degrees have become a requirement mainly to reduce the number of applications that employers have to wade through.

On knuckles - you have 3 on each finger & 2 on the thumb, so 14, but it's quite difficult to maintain 14 different positions to make use of them!

they used their thumb to do the counting, so 3 on each finger and a 'pointer' thumb.

Offline kay

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #62 on: October 01, 2020, 06:15:57 pm »
Interesting conversation with my son "I don't want to go to uni because I don't know what I want to do yet, ...

Suggest they do a 'proper' degree in a subject they find interesting. Perhaps it would lead to an interesting career.

Chris.

If you read the rest of the post, that's what I suggested. Or don't you consider a maths degree to be a proper degree?  ;D

Online PeteHall

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #63 on: October 01, 2020, 07:08:39 pm »
6 is the number they reckon you can keep track of without having to count.
I once had a job in a magazine warehouse, sorting pallets of each publication into packing boxes to go to the newsagents. We always worked in 3's on the basis that you can always visualise 3 without needing to count them.
They had found that if you tried grabbing more than 3 at a time, you would either take longer due to (subconsciously) counting, or mistakes would be made.  3 was optimum for speed and accuracy.
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Online PeteHall

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #64 on: October 01, 2020, 07:26:27 pm »
Interesting conversation with my son "I don't want to go to uni because I don't know what I want to do yet, ...

Suggest they do a 'proper' degree in a subject they find interesting. Perhaps it would lead to an interesting career.

Chris.

This this this. do something that is going to hold their interest for 3 years plus (if they want to go to uni at all)

From what I've heard, uni isn't the fun it used to be, first excessive fees, so students feel the need to study instead of going caving, now with Coronavirus, it just sounds bloody awful.

If I was that age again now, I'd be asking myself serious questions before going to uni...

Asside from the lack of fun, I'm not sure how well it stacks up careers-wise either any more. For example, we have apprentice engineers, who have gone on to do a degree on day release from work. 5 years after leaving school, they have an engineering degree, 5 years experience, no debt and a deposit for a house.

5 years after school, those that went to uni have an engineering degree, less than 1 year's experience and a motherload of debt.
The distance between stupidity and genius is measured only by success.

Offline Fjell

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #65 on: October 01, 2020, 07:59:55 pm »
It's about 2-3% of lifetime earnings for someone earning decent money. The way to get decent money is to go to a top uni. Also gives you options on marrying well, which is double money.

Although if you have the maths, I would recommend economics over engineering these days at a top 10 uni. Right up there with medicine for average earnings.

Offline pwhole

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #66 on: October 01, 2020, 08:21:20 pm »
Do a Fine Art degree, and then it's almost guaranteed you'll never get a proper job ever again. And you certainly won't 'marry well' either, but may have much more fun instead. Worked for me - though I'll die in a ditch for sure ;)

Offline Speleotron

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #67 on: October 01, 2020, 08:28:50 pm »

Although if you have the maths, I would recommend economics over engineering these days at a top 10 uni. Right up there with medicine for average earnings.

Maths and/or computer science would be a better bet for working in finance. Hedge funds can't get enough of maths/compsci PhDs.
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Online PeteHall

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #68 on: October 01, 2020, 08:47:29 pm »
I have an engineering degree from a top 10 uni (albeit a 2.2), my brother has a history degree from a top 10 uni (he got a 1st).
I work in engineering, my brother works in financial management and earns at least 3 times what I do.

I'd speculate that a good degree from a good uni simply demonstrates to an employer that you are capable of learning and capable of working hard, regardless of the subject you choose to study.

Obviously some jobs do require specific subjects and if you aren't sure what you want to do, maths or computer science are probably a pretty safe bet  :thumbsup:
The distance between stupidity and genius is measured only by success.


Offline ZombieCake

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #70 on: October 01, 2020, 10:22:08 pm »
I suppose it's related to what you like to do.  Money isn't necessarily the be all and end all (although I guess it's very nice to have some).  Three years at university isn't a bad thing, although these days it comes at a price. At eighteen did everyone really know what they wanted to do?  Even if we think we did.
Arts isn't a bad thing, for example we wouldn't have a great film industry (panicdemic aside) if everyone wanted to screw over the stock market for as much cash as possible.  Different people have different aims, and those aims change over time.
I'm certainly doing something very different to what I went to Uni for, and I'm probably still not sure what I really want to do.

Offline Speleotron

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #71 on: October 02, 2020, 08:23:19 am »
I'm not saying that everyone should do maths so they can be a quant and they must prioritise making money, just that I think it's odd that maths teachers and careers advisors, in my experience, never mentioned that this was an option. In fact the most lucrative branch of mathematics careers wasn't given a mention at all. It's not all about the money but from the point of view of careers advice it's kind of important to talk about it.
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Offline Fjell

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #72 on: October 02, 2020, 09:02:00 am »
I have long concluded that a career you can happily pursue somewhere like North Yorkshire resolves many issues.

Offline Speleotron

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Re: Fibonacci sequence
« Reply #73 on: October 02, 2020, 09:10:46 am »
That's true for us maybe but kids need to know about all the options they can choose from.
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