Author Topic: Descent Magazine  (Read 17186 times)

Mole

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Descent Magazine
« Reply #50 on: June 29, 2005, 10:14:25 pm »
One of them (PBC?) has been used for shaft-sinking,according to a website I looked at.

I have in the past hand drilled 3/8" holes,and rolled out a 1/4 of a stick to allow it to fit the holes,but it's a pita.

andymorgan

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Descent Magazine
« Reply #51 on: June 29, 2005, 10:57:36 pm »
Quote from: "andymorgan"
I would rather have more detail about larger caves than a 20 metre long hole that I would only put my head in when i am walking a dog past it!


Ok this comment was a bit flippant. :oops:If the truth be told, I would like to find out what cave I put my head down, when I get back home! Without question several caves have been considerably enlarged and become major cave systems.
  I love my guide books and pick them up a few times a week dreaming of potential trips... I would like to see them regularly updated every five years at least. but that I don't think that the smaller sites will be 'lost'. Many of these smaller sites are passed on via word of mouth  (i.e. most locals know of them) and are usually documented in club journals and of course they are still documented in the old guide books.
  Anyway I am getting  :offtopic:. Bringing back in Descent magazine I think the printed word will continue to be better than the internet for many years to come!
 (excuse my ramblings)

George North

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Descent Magazine
« Reply #52 on: June 30, 2005, 01:53:12 am »
Quote
The ideal solution is, of course, Northern Caves on the web, together with updatesfor all caves giving extensions, current accessibility etc.


Word on the grapevine was that some of NC was going to be put on the web as a pay to download style PDF - this could be complete BS however!

As luck would have it a lot of the Easegill/Leck Fell information is allready available on the RRCPC website, and is kept up to date as more stuff is found. It's a shame some of the other clubs haven't done similar things for other areas - but I guess cavers have always been a bit technologically backwards  :wink:

http://www.rrcpc.org.uk/easegill/index.htm

Personally I think that paper and ink still has many years of life left yet. I too love my guidebooks! (I see them more as friends than books. They talk to me in my mind...) And besides you couldn't lug your PC across Casterton Fell, and leave it in the entrance of Wretched Rabbit whilst you go caving and expect it to still work. And paper books have other practical uses too. For instance if you arrive back at the farm after a quick trip down Lancaster Hole and you're a bit cold, then you could burn a useless book that nobody ever uses to keep warm (Caves of the Peak District for instance.)

GN.

Offline paul

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Descent Magazine
« Reply #53 on: June 30, 2005, 07:58:32 am »
Quote from: "George North"
...after a quick trip down Lancaster Hole and you're a bit cold, then you could burn a useless book that nobody ever uses to keep warm (Caves of the Peak District for instance.)
GN.


Them's fighting words! :bash:  :trout:
I'm not a complete idiot: some parts are missing!

Offline kay

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Descent Magazine
« Reply #54 on: June 30, 2005, 08:06:39 am »
Quote
In my opinion I think the smaller caves are the most likely to be updated: i.e. it is quicker to write up a description about smaller caves than larger ones.


 You mention 20m - that's l-o-n-g compared to many in Northern Caves  :wink:

Certainly if I'm wandering round and find an 15 inch high opening with 3 inches of water in the bottom, I much prefer being able to look it up than to crawl in only to discover it becomes impassable afeter 8 feet. Yes, I know I have Northern Caves, but what about the next generation of cavers?

Quote
have already been in touch with National Trust about "losing" caves under their land management to encroaching impenetrable thickets of bramble, hawthorn etc


What about the other problem of losing caves through being used as a convenient rubbish dump or deliberately filled in for safety reasons? To what extent should the 'national heritage' side of preserving caves over-ride the landowner's rights?

Offline Cap'n Chris

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« Reply #55 on: June 30, 2005, 09:07:14 am »
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What about the other problem of losing caves through being used as a convenient rubbish dump or deliberately filled in for safety reasons? To what extent should the 'national heritage' side of preserving caves over-ride the landowner's rights?


"Convenient rubbish dumps" are under the spotlight since the Environment Agency passed legislation stating that by (IIRC) February 2006 farmers must clean up their land or face public whipping (or somesuch). Perhaps Hughie can shed more light on this one.

andymorgan

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Descent Magazine
« Reply #56 on: June 30, 2005, 11:20:12 pm »
The RRCPC website is excellent site. Another good online guide site for the Dales is http://www.braemoor.co.uk/cavingtrip/directory.shtml

Isn't the Peak district known to cavers as the place they pass on the way to the Dales? :lol:

Offline paul

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« Reply #57 on: July 01, 2005, 07:41:23 am »
Quote from: "andymorgan"
Isn't the Peak district known to cavers as the place they pass on the way to the Dales? :lol:


No, the Derbyshire Dales are IN the Peak District!

Mind you, we can always pop over to the Yorkshire Dales when we want to have a look at shorter shafts...  :lol:
I'm not a complete idiot: some parts are missing!

Offline Cumbrian Neil

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« Reply #58 on: July 04, 2005, 04:18:06 am »
Quote from: "George North"
Personally I think that paper and ink still has many years of life left yet. I too love my guidebooks! (I see them more as friends than books. They talk to me in my mind...) And besides you couldn't lug your PC across Casterton Fell, and leave it in the entrance of Wretched Rabbit whilst you go caving and expect it to still work.


Nevermind crossing a fell, unless you have wireless, you can't sit on the throne and page through a guide either.

CN.
Boldly Going Nowhere

mudman

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Descent Magazine
« Reply #59 on: July 06, 2005, 02:11:58 pm »
The Cave Database is probably almost complete with respect to the known Scottish undergound features. It started out as the on-line version of the Scottish Cave Registry that is kept by Dick Grindley of The Grampian Speleology Group. It has had a fair few updates since then with some new caves added, some descriptions added and some photos uploaded.
The point about copyright though is a very good one. My opinion is that descriptions etc. should not be copied out of a guidebook. However, published names and locations are effectively in the public domain and so can be used so long as a reference to the guidebook can the used. The Cave Database does have the facility to add references that can point the user to the relevant source material.
I'm afraid that I got a bit disillusioned with it and haven't done anything that I had planned to do. But, if people wanted to use it to record British cave systems, then I'm open to suggestions.

Offline Mark

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« Reply #60 on: July 07, 2005, 08:29:10 am »
MUDMAN mentioned the cave database

AN ENTRY FROM THE CAVE DATABASE FOR DERBYSHIRE

Derbyshire - Castleton Catchment
Townhead Cave


Grid Ref: SK160845

Description:

Legendary small pot which is difficult to find. Some locals have stood over the entrance and shown others it in front of their noses, only for them to claim there is no entrance there. The pot to those who can see it is a 6m pitch. What lies at the bottom is unknown. Anyone who has been down the hole has never been seen again. Stranger still is the fact that no matter how strong the lamp used, nothing can be seen further than 6m down, only darkness. The combination of this and only a small number of people being able to see the hole has led to the belief that it is either some form of passage to hell, giving it the nickname 'The Devil's Pot'


Its a new one on me

Offline bubba

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Descent Magazine
« Reply #61 on: July 07, 2005, 08:47:57 am »
:lol:
=:blubba:=

[ nsfw ]

Offline rhychydwr1

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Re: Descent Magazine
« Reply #62 on: March 14, 2021, 10:47:35 am »
Fascinating historical item.  To bring it up to date 2021 Descent is still being published No 179 will be out next month!

 

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