• Publication week for Descent 296

    'Having just come back from expedition jetlagged and pushed for time, I thought adding eight extra pages to Descent would be the best way to get back into the swing of things. I hope you'll all find that the extra hours were well spent'.

    Click here for more details of what's in the next edition

Descent 294 - a new look

Chris Scaife

Active member
It's publication week for the next issue of Descent!

Subscribers will receive their copies soon. Not a subscriber? You should be! Follow this link to subscribe.

Individual copies can also be bought from Inglesport, Starless River, or via our website.


Descent 294 cover.jpg


Cover: Geoff Yeadon in Frake’s Passage, Kingsdale, Yorkshire Dales. Photo: Mark Burkey

The Changing Face of Descent
You’ve probably noticed that Descent has changed its appearance somewhat. This seems a good time for Chris Scaife to look back at Descent covers through the ages.

The Aquamole is Back
After a break of 26 years, Geoff Yeadon decided it was time to return to cave diving. This turned into a big event in the Yorkshire Dales, as told by Geoff, Mark Burkey and Roo Walters.

In the Wilds of Crete
British cavers have been visiting Crete’s Lefka Ori – or White Mountains – for many years; but, as Chris Scaife reports, it is still a wild place with undescended holes everywhere.

Of Clouds and Barren Lands
Meghalaya in India is also known as ‘the Abode of the Clouds’ and, as Simon Brooks reports, expeditions to this region never fail to deliver.

Petzl Duffel 85 Review
The large, durable transport bag is reviewed by Chris Scaife. The review is followed by a quiz for your chance to win one.

NAMHO in the Lake District
Chris Jones reports on this year’s NAMHO conference, held in Grasmere.

Extraterrestrial Caves
When Descent was launched in January 1969, humans had not set foot on the moon. Now, in October 2023, we feature an article by
Francesco Sauro and the European Space Agency about the exploration of caves on other planets.

The Oldest Northerners
Tony Brown and Martin Stables write about recent excavations in Cumbria’s Heaning Wood Bone Cave, including the discovery of the oldest human remains ever found in northern England.

Back cover: Loz Appleby in Retdung Khur, Meghalaya, India. Photo: Bill Nix
 

Chris Scaife

Active member
When Descent was launched in January 1969, humans had not set foot on the moon. Now, in October 2023, we feature an article by
Francesco Sauro and the European Space Agency about the exploration of caves on other planets.
In the photo: the Jean pit, a cave entrance on Mars with a minimum depth of 330m; by NASA, HiRISE.


The Jean pit, a cave entrance on Mars with a minimum depth of 330m. Photo NASA, HiRISE.jpg
 
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Sandy

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wellyjen

Well-known member
When Descent was launched in January 1969, humans had not set foot on the moon. Now, in October 2023, we feature an article by
Francesco Sauro and the European Space Agency about the exploration of caves on other planets.
In the photo: the Jean pit, a cave entrance on Mars with a minimum depth of 330m; by NASA, HiRISE.


View attachment 17157
SRT on Mars. Gravity is 38% of that on Earth, so fewer bars on your rack, or a different bobbin style descender. However, your space suit and oxygen tanks are going to increase the all up weight. Shock loads are going to be less, if you take a FF1, so lighter SRT rope. This will need more bars on your rack. Very low air pressure, so cooling your descender is going to rely on radiation and conduction only. Might need hollow rack bars, plugged in to your space suits cooling system. Prussiking is going to be easier. The limitation will be your suits ability to keep you cool while working and muscle wastage from the long zero G trip to get there. What have I missed?
Biggest problem is, how are you going to reach the appropriately named Mars bar in your helmet, without depressurising the suit and dying?
 

ZombieCake

Well-known member
Biggest problem is, how are you going to reach the appropriately named Mars bar in your helmet, without depressurising the suit and dying?
A two pronged approach is needed here as depressurizing and dying is somewhat inconvenient. First of all you need one of those in helmet drinking tube things they have in Formula 1 cars and fill it up with Mars milkshake - a bit of a compromise though. Secondly you need another of the drinking tubes, only this one is filled with beer for the apres cave situation.
 

Chris Scaife

Active member
We're sorry about all of this.

I sent the completed files to the printer on 3 October and all subscribers' copies were dispatched to Royal Mail on 17 October. As soon as it became apparent that there had been a delay in postage we began trying to chase this up and we have persistently contacted the distributors ever since. We have posted on here, on our social media channels and emailed as many of our subscribers as we could to try to keep everyone in the loop.

Yesterday, we were assured by the distributor that all copies have now been located by Royal Mail and they say they will be delivered this week.

We realise this is frustrating for everyone and we thank everyone for being patient.
 

Badlad

Administrator
Staff member
I have noticed a major mistake with the front cover. The photo is upside down. If you turn it the other way up it looks far more like a seventy year old cave diver.
:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 
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