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Risk Assesments

M

Mr_G

Guest
My union is becoming more persistent on the issue of risk assessments.
I have a few questions....
How far do u go when writing one? (Caves are dangerous!)
Also on SRT training?

If any one has any ideas or 1 I could look ova would b greatly appreciated.

Thx
  G
 

Hammy

Member
With a Font size of 9 in a Table you should be able to fit it onto about one and a half sheets of A4.....  ;)


To let you have a look at one that somebody else has prepared rather defeats the object.

The whole idea is that you identify the Hazard, assess the Risk and apply an appropriate Control Measure all by yourself because only you know your aspirations!

(P.S.Google may help!!)
 
E

emgee

Guest
Mr_G said:
My union is becoming more persistent on the issue of risk assessments.
I have a few questions....
How far do u go when writing one? (Caves are dangerous!)
Also on SRT training?

If any one has any ideas or 1 I could look ova would b greatly appreciated.

Thx
  G

Have you tried throwing it back at them by asking what information they require?
 

Cookie

New member
This is a good page to explain risk assessments http://www.hse.gov.uk/risk/index.htm.

Read and absorb:
  • Five steps to risk assessment
  • Example risk assessments
  • FAQs

A search for caving risk assessments came up with the one done by the OUCC http://www.oucc.org.uk/current/clubdocs/Risk%20assess%20OUCC%202006.pdf.

Although it doesn't do everything mentioned above it is one of the better ones that I could find on the net. It should suffice once you have altered it for your particular circumstances.

This one by Islington Council is useful for comparison http://www.islingtonschools.net/DownloadableDocuments/Services/handsriskassessment.pdf.
 

Stu

Active member
I don't want to comment on the links; as has already been to be meaningful you will have to go though the process yourself. One piece of advice handed to me by AALA is to keep the document fairly simple. It's supposed to be easily read and understood by anyone who may lead or engage on trips. Keep it relevant and fairly general. Don't think of it as a litigation shield. It won't be. It's one piece in a wider range of processes to allow you to say in confidence that the activity has been thought through.

TBH I'm surprised you haven't got one already - that's how I read your post anyway.
 

cap n chris

Well-known member
I guess on the SRT training element you'll be wanting something approaching CIC training/assessment or advice from BCA/CHECC
 

Andy Sparrow

Active member
Mr_G said:
My union is becoming more persistent on the issue of risk assessments.
I have a few questions....
How far do u go when writing one? (Caves are dangerous!)
Also on SRT training?

If any one has any ideas or 1 I could look ova would b greatly appreciated.

Thx
  G

The good thing about risk assessments........

is that it will require you and your colleagues to brainstorm the potential risks and hazards of caving and SRT and make you think about how to develop safe practices.

The bad thing about risk assessments.......

is the beaurocratic tossers who think that being given some document that they are not qualified to judge the merits of, and filing this way, is is some way going to make you safer or cover their arse.

The big joke is the common practice of downloading/copying some generic risk assessment to appease the beaurocrats.  You don't read it and neither do they - it just goes in the file and everybody is happy.  I guess it's not so bad if you actually take the time to sit down and analyse the RA and consider what the key points are.

 

Peter Burgess

New member
People have done risk assessments since the dawn of time. Every day from waking to going to bed you do risk assessments. The problem comes when you have to actually put them on paper. Having to consciously think of how to do something that you have always done sub-consciously.
 

ianball11

Active member
It's your Union so ask them for help in doing them.
Remember to view the things you do with relation to other Union groups aswell. I'd say you are less likely to be injured in caving than playing football, less likely to be seriously injured than Rugby but the necessary help could be a very long way away, that is what usually worries guys with student activities in their remit.
Ian B.
 

cap n chris

Well-known member
IIRC Pete Mohr's statistical analysis of outdoor pursuits did indeed indicate that you are more likely to get non fatally injured playing rugby or football than by going caving (somewhere to the ratio of about 100:1, amazingly). However, conversely, the fatal injury rate versus rugby/football was something like 160:1).

Put simply: if your bootlaces snap/become loose you'll possibly trip. If your abseiling rope fails you'll possibly die.


 

beardedboy

Member
One of the most important risks for the RA I wrote for the club was:

Risk- Dehydration. Prevention- Ensure everyone has ample amounts to drink before entering the cave!  :beer: (y)
 

cap n chris

Well-known member
The emoticons seem to hint you're recommending people drink alcohol before caving but that would be totally irresponsible, wouldn't it?
 

Brains

Well-known member
INHO thats what most cavers do about 12 hours before attempting to cave. Sleep in between is an option most seem to select....
 
D

DCWB

Guest
I don't know about getting it onto 1 page of paper....the CDG one goes on for 22 pages:

http://www.cavedivinggroup.org.uk/Articles/RiskAssessmentFinal050905.pdf

 

AndyF

New member
cap 'n chris said:
The emoticons seem to hint you're recommending people drink alcohol before caving but that would be totally irresponsible, wouldn't it?

No he's not, those two emoticon guys have McDonalds McFlurry pseudo milk shakes....

...come to think about ti that is truly irresponsible
 

graham

New member
The UBSS general one is here. It is in the form requested by the union. We have also done a specific one for SRT training but that won't help much as it applies to the very particular circumstances in which we train.
 
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