"Rope Free" en Français?

JasonC

Well-known member
I was idly wondering last night, what French cavers say instead of "Rope Free!" when getting off a rope. Is it "Corde libre!" or something else?
None of my companions knew, even one who was in the Berger last year.

Come to that, what about other languages ?

(I won't even mention variations within one language: I believe Americans yell "Rock!" where we normally bellow "Below!")
 

Leclused

Active member
Just to complete the list a bit.

For a rock they yell “caillou” in french
When passing a belay they yell "passé"
When the start a descent/ascent a the beginning of a rope they yell "Départ"
 
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JasonC

Well-known member
Just to complete the list a bit.

For a rock they yell “caillou” in french
When passing a belay they yell "passé"
When the start a descent/ascent a the beginning of a rope they yell "Départ"
Thankyou, Leclused. You were in my mind when I posted the question.
"passé" made me smile: as you probably know, it has a different connotation in English.

I wonder if we have any more languages to add to the repertoire?
 

Loki

Active member
Thanks. I liked "Pierre!" - could be confusing !
If you’re on an alpine climb and someone above yells Pierre, throw your rucksack over yer head, make yourself small and pray it doesn’t get you or your rope! In my experience it’s not some poxy pebble on its way.
 

mikem

Well-known member
As literal as Ab (down) seil (rope) whilst the french use rappel (braking - which is less encouraging when the others hear breaking!)
 

ChrisB

Well-known member
'rappel' doesn't mean 'braking'. It means remember, recall or return - in a climbing context, it's returning to ground level after the climb. The word is still used in caving even though we do the descent at the start.

You see Rappel on French roadsigns when they are reminding you of the speed limit, or a hazard.
 
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