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Spelling and Apostrophes

Kenilworth

New member
langcliffe said:
Kenilworth said:
proffessionally...  non-possesive

Are these further examples of American spellings?

Proffessionally - apparently so. What's the British?
Possesive - was my mistake. I would blame this tiny touch screen if not for the hordes of similar blunders I catch when editing my handwritten drafts.
 

pwhole

Well-known member
I do prefer US spellings for most things. Most words they changed (I think Webster did most of them) seemed to be 'sissy' French words with awkward 'u's.

Personally, apostrophe misuse drives me mad. There are two adjacent shops in Sheffield city centre - one a fish and chip shop called 'Trawlers Catch', and next door is a sandwich shop called 'Sarni's'. Both massive expensive vinyl signs. I find it hilarious, but then I was probably the only person in Sheffield to find a spelling mistake on my polling card a few years ago - 'Reprsentation of the Peoples Act'. Every card had it wrong, but when I mentioned it at the polling office they just looked panicked, especially when I asked if an act can be enforced if spelled incorrectly. There's a vinyl banner in a shop window down the road from me that offers 'Acommdaton' - and also serving as an example of their banner-printing service.

Frank Zappa was so intrigued about the use and misuse of apostrophes that he did a whole album about it:

http://globalia.net/donlope/fz/lyrics/Apostrophe_(').html

Stink-foot is the key lyric. 

Ben Watson's The Negative Dialectics Of Poodle Play, a monster analysis of Zappa's work delves even deeper into an analysis of conceptual continuity, as expressed on the above track, and FZ's entire library of work. It's a masterpiece of apparent irrelevance, and thoroughly recommended, though probably only if you like Zappa.

And apostrophes  :sneaky:

Before anyone points it out, there are still a few typos in TSG 19, but I was exhausted  o_O

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9FBQ1O5F8k
 

paul

Moderator
It's not apostrophe misuse, but a typo on a metal sign affixed to the "official" start if the Pennine Way in Edale. Every time I walk past this sign it makes be laugh:




 

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Kenilworth

New member
langcliffe said:
Kenilworth said:
langcliffe said:
Kenilworth said:
proffessionally...  non-possesive

Are these further examples of American spellings?

Proffessionally - apparently so. What's the British?

We would spell it 'professionally' - as does Miriam-Webster.

Good lord. As do all americans who can spell properly.
Utterly blind to my (repeated) mistake that time.
The fact is that I have a great deal of difficulty with some spellings. When editing my cave book I had to check every instance of the word field, which appeared many times and which I had misspelled probably half of them. There are many similar examples and I cannot understand why they give me so much trouble.
 

Roger W

Well-known member
The trouble is that when we read through something we have written or typed to check the spelling, we tend to read what we think ought to be there instead of what actually is there.

A long time ago a certain well-known confectionery company took delivery of a large batch of cartons for their popular assortment of choclates and toffees.  It was only when the first production samples came up to the lab that it was noticed that an "I" had been missed out from the name of the company.  The artworks had been checked several times, but everyone had read what they thought must surely be there...

That's how I got the job of checking all the copy on the cartons after that  :)

(Incidentally, the printers disclaimed all responsibility.  Whether they had noticed the misspelling or not, the wrongly spelt artwork and proofs had been signed off by our packaging people!)
 

Fulk

Well-known member
Hmmmm . . . so if it's missing an 'I' it wasn't Cadbury, Rowntree, Thornton, Fox, Fry's . . . . oh, I give up.
 

JasonC

Well-known member
pwhole said:
There are two adjacent shops in Sheffield city centre - one a fish and chip shop called 'Trawlers Catch'...

This could just be a statement of what commercial fishing boats do ?

(which also illustrates why we need and should love apostrophes ;) )
 

Laurie

Active member
It amazes me just how many people write in 'text speak' even when they are not using a phone.
There is no excuse for bad grammar.
There is no excuse for poor spelling.
 

alastairgott

Well-known member
Roger W said:
A long time ago a certain well-known confectionery company took delivery of a large batch of cartons for their popular assortment of choclates and toffees.  It was only when the first production samples came up to the lab that it was noticed that an "I" had been missed out from the name of the company.

Quality Street?
Celebrations?
Lindt?
 

Roger W

Well-known member
You're getting warmer - but the Quality was first-class, if I remember correctly - it's a good many years ago!
 

bat

Member
Laurie said:
There is no excuse for bad grammar.
There is no excuse for poor spelling.

I hope people are more tolerant of your shortcoming than you seem to be of there?s
 

Laurie

Active member
bat said:
I hope people are more tolerant of your shortcoming than you seem to be of there?s
A just said, there are 'reasons' and 'excuses', totally different things.
 

Kenilworth

New member
Laurie said:
bat said:
I hope people are more tolerant of your shortcoming than you seem to be of there?s
A just said, there are 'reasons' and 'excuses', totally different things.

Not really, most dictionary definitions of excuse use the word "reason" prominently, and this is a favorite line of those who have just said something silly.
There are plenty of excuses, good and bad.
 
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