Author Topic: CAVE PEARLS FOR SALE  (Read 18565 times)

Wayne Harrison

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CAVE PEARLS FOR SALE
« Reply #25 on: April 17, 2006, 12:53:10 am »
I had an idea for making cave pearls at home:

Taking small, broken limestone pieces from outside a cave (or a limestone cliff, for that matter)  and rolling it in a rock tumbler, just as you would a rough stone to turn it into a polished stone.  I just don't know what it would look like if it weren't wet all the time.

emgee

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CAVE PEARLS FOR SALE
« Reply #26 on: April 17, 2006, 01:08:25 am »
Quote from: "Wayne Harrison"
I had an idea for making cave pearls at home:

Taking small, broken limestone pieces from outside a cave (or a limestone cliff, for that matter)  and rolling it in a rock tumbler, just as you would a rough stone to turn it into a polished stone.  I just don't know what it would look like if it weren't wet all the time.


It'd probably establish a market for imitation cave pearls. Which would then create a market for the real thing. Go and wash your mouth out with sump water :)

Offline Cap'n Chris

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CAVE PEARLS FOR SALE
« Reply #27 on: April 17, 2006, 07:51:15 am »
Wayne would just be making irregular polished limestone pebbles (the process is known as lapidiary / lapidary).

Cave pearls are very different, composed of layer upon layer of calcite often almost spherical (although you can get cubic ones). http://www.goodearthgraphics.com/virtcave/pearls/pearls7.jpg

Wayne Harrison

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CAVE PEARLS FOR SALE
« Reply #28 on: April 17, 2006, 10:54:48 pm »
So I shouldn't plan on retiring on the money made from idea, then?

(BTW - regarding your avatar... I live 20 miles from the real South Park in Colorado)

Online Roger W

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CAVE PEARLS FOR SALE
« Reply #29 on: April 18, 2006, 05:31:26 am »
So what you need to do is get some little bits of limestone, set 'em rolling in a rotating pan, and drip calcium-laden cave water onto them.  The trick is to get the rate of dripping of the water and the rate of evaporation (air of the right temperature and humidity blown into the pan at the right rate) to get the calcium carbonate to crystallise in the right form as a series of layers until you build up some big enough 'pearls'.

But - as has been said - if you do succeed, you will only stoke a market that others will seek to supply by pinching the real thing out of caves.

Don't bother!
"That, of course, is the dangerous part about caves:  you don't know how far they go back, sometimes... or what is waiting for you inside."   JRR Tolkein: "The Hobbit"

 

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