Author Topic: What is Readybrek? (or what food adventures have you had in the last two weeks)  (Read 3922 times)

Offline pwhole

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So, it's potato and lentil...erm...spicy something then? I would have still gone for the dripping blood as well personally, given the opportunity. Waitrose seems to be the only store around here anyone's queuing for. I guess it does take their average customer longer, what with all the conversations ;)

Offline owd git

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I don't have a garden so I'm growing radishes indoors. Seems to be a good return on investment in terms of strength of flavour / space taken up.
Don't forget to make full use of your radishes, the green tops are of more nutritional value than the root. Raw, cooked, made into pesto, check on line!  :thumbsup: O. G.
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Offline Pegasus

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Have been shopping for essential supplies -  Can you work out who gets what??  ;D

Offline Fulk

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I guess you get the wine and the chocolate, Pegasus, and the dobbin gets the mints.

Offline Pegasus

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I think you'll find Tim won't be happy with that :)

Offline badger

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so tim gets 2 pkts polo's and boris gets 2 packs

Offline owd git

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OK;  who gets the holes from the Polo's?
Hen racer? 2000 world hen racing champion

Offline Ian Ball

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Readybrek!  My Mother used to buy a box of that for us to eat before school.  A small box used to last about a year, porridge was not for me back then, but now I eat it pretty much daily. I do wonder if the actual stuff you put in it is what you enjoy, blueberries in porridge is lovely.  I also like seeds, sunflower, pumpkin most.  Gives a bit of a crunch to it and ups the protein a little for the veggies.

The Scots and their salted porridge used to confuse me, but now I go for a spoon of marmite which is quite salty even the low sodium stuff I use and a shot of chilli sauce.  It's the smallest amount you can pour out as I have a bottle of the most strong sauce I've ever tasted and to be honest it scares me how hot it is, (some good reviews on that site) probably I'm a bit of a wimp when it comes to big scovilles. Lasts for ages though at the amount I use so great value.




Offline pwhole

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I like the idea of chilli in porridge - might try that, though I'll skip the Marmite! I was introduced to chilli jam in California a long time ago - on scones, with cream (they knew I was coming) - just a fabulous taste and wasn't hot at all. That sauce of yours looks vaguely familiar - I remember bringing something like that back from New Orleans that destroyed everything on contact, but had a lovely flavour when you'd recovered.

Offline Pegasus

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I've never liked beer of any kind, however tried this last night 'cos of the name - awful, just awful  :o   How do folks drink the stuff??  :yucky: :yucky: :yucky:


Offline Pitlamp

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Practice, practice practice!   ;)

Offline thehungrytroglobite

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Marmite in porridge is an absolute banger. Try mixing in some butter too, and grating cheddar cheese on top

Offline Pegasus

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Marmite in porridge is an absolute banger. Try mixing in some butter too, and grating cheddar cheese on top

Cheese on porridge  :o

Offline mikem

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Not recently, but in Chile we drank a lot of red wine & coke, with cheap wine it improved both!

Offline cavemanmike

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Not recently, but in Chile we drank a lot of red wine & coke, with cheap wine it improved both!
Coke  :o :o

Offline PeteHall

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Cheap white wine 50/50 with cheap cider improves both (or maybe it just kills your taste buds...)

Offline mikem

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Coke  :o :o
Not the coal substitute! Easily available everywhere in South America, as is coca in the high altitude bits  ;)

(You do know that's why it's called coca cola)

Offline CavingPig

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Readybrek was my favourite breakfast as a kid in the 90s, I couldn't understand all the hate for it when I bought a load of supermarket-brand stuff for an expedition a couple of years ago. Apparently I was supposed to get fancy stuff with flavours already in?  ::)

Another top porridge tip: plenty of milk, a pinch of salt then a wee dram of your favourite whisk(e)y mixed in. Warms you right up!

In other culinary adventures, my housemate and I decided our resolution/project for 2021 would be to cook a meal from 52 different countries. We drew up a list and put names in a jar, and we're taking it turn about - so far we've had Georgia, Myanmar, Tibet, Cuba and Korea, and I'm looking forward to what she produces on an Afghan theme tonight. (Yes, we've upped the pace a little given lockdown - just getting ahead for when we (hopefully!!) are allowed to go places again...)

Offline chunky

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Chocolate custard....it's a super food...you don't need anything else.

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Offline kay

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Have bought an air fryer so can make chips

...and have planted lots of veg seeds, should plant some spuds really #diggingforvictory  ;D

You're better off growing tomatoes or soft fruit - a) more expensive to buy in the shops b) imported from Europe c) don't need so much ground to grow a quantity that will make a difference to our diet.

I'm speaking from ignorance here- I haven't a clue whetehr we grow all our potatoes, just guessing that we grow most of them given Scotland's per-eminence as a supplier of virus-free seed potatoes. And I'm not sure where we get our soft fruit from. But I do know that, in terms of maximising monetary yield from the garden, it's better to grow high value items rather than low value items that need to be grown in large quantity.









Offline Pegasus

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Have bought an air fryer so can make chips

...and have planted lots of veg seeds, should plant some spuds really #diggingforvictory  ;D

You're better off growing tomatoes or soft fruit - a) more expensive to buy in the shops b) imported from Europe c) don't need so much ground to grow a quantity that will make a difference to our diet.

I'm speaking from ignorance here- I haven't a clue whetehr we grow all our potatoes, just guessing that we grow most of them given Scotland's per-eminence as a supplier of virus-free seed potatoes. And I'm not sure where we get our soft fruit from. But I do know that, in terms of maximising monetary yield from the garden, it's better to grow high value items rather than low value items that need to be grown in large quantity.

I do  ;D  Toms, raspberries, blackcurrant, damsons, apples. One of best things to grown is runner beans - taste better fresh and expensive to buy.  Currently eating leeks, parsnips and broccoli from the garden - but no parsnips today, frozen into the ground  ;D

Offline kay

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I do  ;D  Toms, raspberries, blackcurrant, damsons, apples. One of best things to grown is runner beans - taste better fresh and expensive to buy.  Currently eating leeks, parsnips and broccoli from the garden - but no parsnips today, frozen into the ground  ;D

I'm eating kale and Asturian Tree Cabbage - it grows forever, just gets a longer and longer stalk.

Mulberries are pretty good - can't buy them fresh and they freeze well. A good addition to Readybrek.


Offline Pegasus

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Badlad is living up to his name and was drinking this last night :o :o :o


Offline maxb727

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Have bought an air fryer so can make chips

...and have planted lots of veg seeds, should plant some spuds really #diggingforvictory  ;D

You're better off growing tomatoes or soft fruit - a) more expensive to buy in the shops b) imported from Europe c) don't need so much ground to grow a quantity that will make a difference to our diet.

I'm speaking from ignorance here- I haven't a clue whetehr we grow all our potatoes, just guessing that we grow most of them given Scotland's per-eminence as a supplier of virus-free seed potatoes. And I'm not sure where we get our soft fruit from. But I do know that, in terms of maximising monetary yield from the garden, it's better to grow high value items rather than low value items that need to be grown in large quantity.

I do  ;D  Toms, raspberries, blackcurrant, damsons, apples. One of best things to grown is runner beans - taste better fresh and expensive to buy.  Currently eating leeks, parsnips and broccoli from the garden - but no parsnips today, frozen into the ground  ;D
I second growing runner beans - they are so tasty but also able to be grown in a pot which helps anyone without access to garden.

On that note mange tout are plentiful, and easy to grow. The more your pick, the more they grow!

Offline pwhole

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Coke  :o :o
Not the coal substitute! Easily available everywhere in South America, as is coca in the high altitude bits  ;)

(You do know that's why it's called coca cola)

Someone gave me some coca tea bags to try last year, from a branded supply - it was rubbish. Waitrose Italian espresso beans are far stronger, so I ditched the teabags and went back to the stove-top pot. A friend of mine swears by yerba mate, but then she swears a lot. That's virtually undrinkable IMO, but it was marginally better than the coca tea bags.

 

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