Author Topic: Passage names  (Read 2820 times)

Offline Duck ditch

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Passage names
« on: April 05, 2020, 07:18:07 pm »
I enjoyed reading how the late breakfast series in long kin west got its name from wardy.  Does anybody else have any insights into named bits of caves.  Why is battle axe pitch in lost johns. named when all above is religious.  What about squashed chihuahua in king pot.

My contribution is when Pegasus came back after exploring new passage. She was eagerly asked what she had found. Instead of a full description of the passage she merely said “I have a wet belly”.   Not what her eager fellow explorers wanted to hear.

Online Fulk

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2020, 07:41:03 pm »
One of my favourites is ‘Green and Smelly Passage’, which makes it sound like a really horrible, dismal place – more like a sewer than a cave. In fact, Green and Smelly Passage is a lovely bit of cave, and the name is totally misleading; evidently, when the cave was first being explored, cavers on the surface carried out a dye test, introducing fluorescein into a sinking stream, while others set off a smoke bomb in order to carry out a test of where a draughting entrance was likely to go. Underground, explorers in a new passage were suddenly assailed by choking acrid fumes, after which (or possibly before which) the water turned bright green – so those two attributes were temporary and short lived, and the passage has got a name that (unfortunately?) stuck.

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2020, 08:24:10 pm »
" Mr Trundle's I Scream Parlour ". Found this year and the " screamer " may be identified eventually. Trundling was a favourite practice along the dig in Reservoir Hole. ie rolling boulders back along 30m of the dig.

Online mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2020, 09:22:06 pm »

Online Fulk

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2020, 11:15:12 pm »
Here’s are two more (well, not passage names, but nevertheless cave feature names) from the Easegill System . . . both, sadly, now gone:

Platypus Junction
The Plumber’s Nightmare

The former was so-called from a strange piece of rock jutting out into the passage, which had a fancied resemblance to the bill of a duck-billed platypus, albeit on a grand scale, being probably 2–3 feet long and a foot or so wide; unfortunately it’s now broken (I believe you can still see it lying in the stream below where it used to be). So how the hell did it get broken? My best guess is that some twat stood on it and broke it off.

And as for the latter, this used to be an intricate conglomeration of stalactites/helictites, maybe just less than a foot high, that used to adorn Broadway in County Pot. The passage here is perhaps 6 feet high and 7–8 wide, with a false floor on the left-hand side (as you look downstream). The thing is, the false floor juts out some way into the passage and the formation was situated between the roof and the false floor, such that anyone would surmise that the formation would have been protected; but no, some pillock must have reached 2 or 3 feet into this area in order to deliberately break it.

Online mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2020, 11:34:23 pm »
More here (I'm sure there are other threads):
https://ukcaving.com/board/index.php?topic=2776.0

Offline Judi Durber

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2020, 10:40:46 am »
NNoooo    :o     :( :( :( :(  It was such a great feature to show the children as a way-mark on a turning point.

Quote
Platypus Junction

The former was so-called from a strange piece of rock jutting out into the passage, which had a fancied resemblance to the bill of a duck-billed platypus, albeit on a grand scale, being probably 2–3 feet long and a foot or so wide; unfortunately it’s now broken (I believe you can still see it lying in the stream below where it used to be). So how the hell did it get broken? My best guess is that some twat stood on it and broke it off.
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Online Fulk

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2020, 10:56:51 am »
Afraid so, Judi; actually, it's been broken for some time now – probably several years. I suppose that if you were new to the system and walked past it, you wouldn't know that anything was amiss

Offline Roger W

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2020, 11:12:02 am »
Here’s are two more (well, not passage names, but nevertheless cave feature names) from the Easegill System . . . both, sadly, now gone:

Platypus Junction
The Plumber’s Nightmare

The former was so-called from a strange piece of rock jutting out into the passage, which had a fancied resemblance to the bill of a duck-billed platypus, albeit on a grand scale, being probably 2–3 feet long and a foot or so wide; unfortunately it’s now broken (I believe you can still see it lying in the stream below where it used to be). So how the hell did it get broken? My best guess is that some twat stood on it and broke it off.



I don't suppose it would be possible to fish the broken bit out of the stream and araldite it back in place?
"That, of course, is the dangerous part about caves:  you don't know how far they go back, sometimes... or what is waiting for you inside."   JRR Tolkein: "The Hobbit"

Online Fulk

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2020, 11:21:58 am »
It's quite a substantial chunk of rock, Roger, so I don't think that araldite by itself would be strong enough. It would need holes drilling in the broken piece and the place where it came from, and some kind of rods to hold it together. Quite a tricky task.

Offline langcliffe

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2020, 11:22:45 am »
Here’s are two more (well, not passage names, but nevertheless cave feature names) from the Easegill System . . . both, sadly, now gone:

Platypus Junction
The Plumber’s Nightmare

The former was so-called from a strange piece of rock jutting out into the passage, which had a fancied resemblance to the bill of a duck-billed platypus, albeit on a grand scale, being probably 2–3 feet long and a foot or so wide; unfortunately it’s now broken (I believe you can still see it lying in the stream below where it used to be). So how the hell did it get broken? My best guess is that some twat stood on it and broke it off.



I don't suppose it would be possible to fish the broken bit out of the stream and araldite it back in place?

Possibly - but we have attempted to position the most likely candidates, and we cannot get a decent fit. As Fulk says, the damage was caused a long time ago, and I suspect that either the most likely candidate has been subjected to extensive weathering which has rounded off the point of fracture, or more likely,  the beak fractured into more than one fragment.

Offline Trogger

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2020, 07:59:31 pm »
Here's a picture of it in Oct 2004, if this works. It's the one on the left..!

Offline Trogger

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #12 on: April 06, 2020, 10:32:23 pm »
and here's a closer-up if you want to stick the platypus on again...

Offline oldboy

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2020, 12:19:17 pm »
An early picture from the Ron Bliss collection, RRCPC library, with a younger Jim Eyre.

Offline Trogger

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2020, 02:47:30 pm »
That's a much better picture than mine!  Taken from a different angle, but makes me wonder whether it had already suffered some damage when our picture was taken. Or whether our picture was really the platypus at all?! It was taken at Platypus Junction though.

Offline langcliffe

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2020, 03:04:00 pm »
That's a much better picture than mine!  Taken from a different angle, but makes me wonder whether it had already suffered some damage when our picture was taken. Or whether our picture was really the platypus at all?! It was taken at Platypus Junction though.

I didn't think your picture was of the Platypus, but I couldn't find a picture of the remnants of the actual one to back that view up. The above is it, but it is now a foot or so shorter.

Offline davel

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2020, 06:32:08 pm »
Does anyone know when it was broken?

I think it was complete in February 1969 when I first went there and I remember that viewed from end-on it widened out at the end like the bill of a platypus.

However, according to my log, it was broken when I next saw it in May 1972.

Dave


Offline Duck ditch

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2020, 10:06:08 pm »
Actually I know who the perpetrator is.  He is very remorseful of his action when he was young. He was a pretty wild and hard caver in his day.  A few years ago I gave him a platypus soft toy at a New Year’s Eve party.  He felt ashamed of his Actions on that day and wasn’t pleased to be reminded of the incident. His fellow cavers berated him at the time.  He never damaged a cave after this but he sure was a character above ground.  I was going to say early 70s.  Could easily have been 1971 to tie in with the last post.
Sad
I was hoping for amusing tales of cave passage naming
« Last Edit: April 07, 2020, 10:14:33 pm by Duck ditch »

Offline blackshiver

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2020, 10:42:59 pm »
To get this back on topic and to try to make people smile.....
“Dinosaur Penis Bone Chamber” in Jenga Pot.
While trying to dive and pump sump 1 in Jenga the North York Moors Caving Club and Yorkies were sat in the pub discussing what might lay beyond the sump. An imaginative prospective survey on the back of a beer mat included the as yet undiscovered chamber and imaginary passages that might lay beyond.
Wild Swimming with Prof Alice Roberts had just been on the telly and a discussion ensued as to how The Prof could be enticed into the (Rather Horrific) partly pumped passage. It was decided that the only way this was ever likely to happen would be to find a chamber that contained a Dinosaur Penis Bone.
Unfortunately when the sump broke - we only found a chamber.......
I have a plan so cunning you could pin a tail on it and call it a Weasel.

Online mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2020, 10:54:47 pm »
Sorry to backtrack, but this was apparently 2012:

« Last Edit: April 08, 2020, 08:21:37 am by Badlad, Reason: change image size »

Offline blackshiver

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2020, 11:09:20 pm »
OK here is another one. Hudgill burn mine cavern has lots of Russian Themed names. The guys initially broke though a iron stained fin which crossed a passage and they called this The Iron Curtain. As the massive survey grew we needed to make sense of the place and the Russian theme continued, an area of heavy breakdown became Stalingrad. The big passage became the Trans Siberian Highway and a dug tight section became The Thin Red Line - named after an incident during the Crimean war which was being fought at the time Hudgill Burn mine was actually operating (1854).
I have a plan so cunning you could pin a tail on it and call it a Weasel.

Offline Duck ditch

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #21 on: April 07, 2020, 11:28:49 pm »
It’s the rock in front of formation not the formation

Online mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #22 on: April 07, 2020, 11:51:27 pm »
Have to scroll across the picture (I know you can reduce size, but couldn't be bothered to work out how at this time of night - so if mod wants to do it...)

Offline mrodoc

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #23 on: April 08, 2020, 06:59:28 am »
Rob Harper has a penchant for wacky names. Simon Brooks and I surveyed Attila the Hun's Sardine Cannery in Wookey 20 some years ago.

Online mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #24 on: April 08, 2020, 08:30:58 am »
Hypoxia?

 

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