Author Topic: Obscure or Obsolete Caving Terms  (Read 1750 times)

Offline Duck ditch

  • menacing presence
  • **
  • Posts: 229
Re: Obscure or Obsolete Caving Terms
« Reply #50 on: July 09, 2020, 06:29:05 am »
Creep comes before a slump.  Especially on digs I’ve been involved in :annoyed:
Dripstone instead of Flowstone or is it a curtain or a drape.


Offline nearlywhite

  • obsessive maniac
  • ***
  • Posts: 329
Re: Obscure or Obsolete Caving Terms
« Reply #51 on: July 09, 2020, 07:18:10 am »
I'm not sure an American pit is equivalent to a British pitch, I think it might be closer to a British pot?

Pits don't have a defined shape and can be open or closed. Also, Avens are Domes - even if they aren't very dome like.

Do they bother breaking them into pitches?

They call them 'multi-drops' and they are considered very technical.

Offline Andy Sparrow

  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 1228
    • new website now online
Re: Obscure or Obsolete Caving Terms
« Reply #52 on: July 09, 2020, 10:10:50 am »
But what were the words in the original French, as someone else did the translations?
'gut' is possibly a translation for 'meandre', a tall rift

There's a passage in the Dent de Crolles described as 'gut'.  All very low-roofed.  Intestine like rather than tall rift I think.
Andy Sparrow



Online Fulk

  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 4235
Re: Obscure or Obsolete Caving Terms
« Reply #53 on: July 11, 2020, 11:43:09 am »
In Cadoux’s book One Thousand Metres Down the term gallery is used quite a lot, apparently just to refer to a passage; I think that this book was translated and published for a non-specialist readership. e.g.

‘Going along a low gallery barely five feet high for some 15 metres . . .’ (Interesting mix of units.)

‘Several galleries offered exits from the hall. They chose the largest . . . a diaclase . . .’

You don’t often come across diaclase these days.

And what about:

‘Wedged tightly in this flattening-mill or rather drawplate . . . . Fancy his having penetrated into this awful cat-run without knowing whether he could get back!’

Online Fulk

  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 4235
Re: Obscure or Obsolete Caving Terms
« Reply #54 on: July 11, 2020, 01:54:52 pm »
Quote: 'Dripstone instead of Flowstone'

I was under the impression that 'dripstone' forms by water dripping from the roof, while 'flowstone' is deposited by water flowing over a surface – so two different things.

Offline Kenilworth

  • forum star
  • ****
  • Posts: 638
Re: Obscure or Obsolete Caving Terms
« Reply #55 on: July 11, 2020, 10:05:39 pm »
I'm not sure an American pit is equivalent to a British pitch, I think it might be closer to a British pot?

Pits don't have a defined shape and can be open or closed. Also, Avens are Domes - even if they aren't very dome like.

Do they bother breaking them into pitches?

They call them 'multi-drops' and they are considered very technical.

Generally any vertical component that requires climbing is called a pit. Multi-drop is a term commonly used for a cave that involves multiple pits, not necessarily a single pit broken up into pitches. Nearlywhite is correct in saying that a pit with rebelays is considered technical, since they are relatively uncommon (a result of their being unnecessary).

Offline Subpopulus Hibernia

  • menacing presence
  • **
  • Posts: 184
  • Shannon Group
Re: Obscure or Obsolete Caving Terms
« Reply #56 on: July 11, 2020, 11:39:21 pm »
‘Several galleries offered exits from the hall. They chose the largest . . . a diaclase . . .’

You don’t often come across diaclase these days.

The only place I've seen it is in that book - I think it's just the word that the translator settled on and it never really stuck in general caving parlance.

I think it means what we would refer to now as a rift?
Born Salzburg 1691. B.Phil. University of 's-Hertogenbosch 1718. Personal assistant to King Frederick of Liechtenstein, 1803-1857. Speaker of 35th Upper Silesian Parliament (fl. 1904-5). Owner/operator, Bridgend Underwear Factory, 1973-present.

Offline langcliffe

  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 2518
    • Caving Routes in the Northern Dales
Re: Obscure or Obsolete Caving Terms
« Reply #57 on: July 12, 2020, 01:02:31 am »
‘Several galleries offered exits from the hall. They chose the largest . . . a diaclase . . .’

You don’t often come across diaclase these days.

The only place I've seen it is in that book - I think it's just the word that the translator settled on and it never really stuck in general caving parlance.

I think it means what we would refer to now as a rift?

Absolutely. It's commonly used in French to describe rift / joint passages, and the translator seems not to have translated it.

 

Main Menu

Forum Home Help Search