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Expert's opinion is needed toidentify animal found in a cave

Z

zenas

Guest
As the result of a recent cave-exploration, two members of the Hellenic Speleological Society
found human and animal's bones. Can anyone identify the animal from the attached photo ?

leloudas4.jpg


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D

darkplaces

Guest
hamster?
Its hard to see scale, ruler or foot should have been placed in picture.
 
Z

zenas

Guest
Ths size of the skull is like the size of a small dog.

Some more opinions i have receive so far:

From USA:
What about Nutria? I recently found the lower left jaw with tooth and compared to a complete beaver skull - it was definitely not beaver, and we concluded nutria given the area in which it was found.

From USA:
I would have to say (from the tooth growth) it is some kind of rodent. Obvious I know... but sometimes the obvious is missed.

From USA:
First things first. Take a look at that sketch you posted of the rabbit skull. There is a "peg tooth' noted. This is a second upper incisor located directly behind those big obvious front teeth. Now go back to your original full-sized photo and see if it is clear whether this tooth is either present, or there is a hole there where it was. From the posted photo, I think this skull had this tooth, but can't be sure. If the tooth is present, it is not a rodent but a lagomorph, ie, rabbit, hare or pika. If the tooth is absent, then you have a rodent. That will get you to the "Order" at least. And just to answer the unasked question about those funky teeth. Rodents and Lagomorphs have continually growing teeth. If they don't chew on rough stuff like grass, acorns or whatnot, their teeth will continue to grow but not be "filed back" so to speak by the food they are eating. Looks like this guy was eating a soft diet for some reason, and the teeth just kept growing. Could be part of why the creature died. Cheers, Keith Christenson.

From RUSSIA:
It is Lagomorpha, Leporidae - Oryctolagus or Lepus. Most probably, animal fall down to cave and die without proper food. Dr. S. Gazaryan, Institute of ecology of Mountain Territories, Kabardino-Balkarian Centre of RAS Nalchik.

From GREECE:
90% must be a snake.
_____________________
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