What do you take with you?

LadyMud

Member
Hmm, I'd prefer a slice of pizza on my head to pork scratchings (I'm vegetarian). But a dark choc Bounty wouldn't last even 5 minutes, I'd need to take something I didn't actually like.

Anyway, thanks to everyone for your suggestions. Lots to think about!
 

PeteHall

Moderator
a dark choc Bounty wouldn't last even 5 minutes, I'd need to take something I didn't actually like.
Good logic, I used to carry an 'emergency snickers bar' that had been forgotten in the pocket of a tackle bag for months. It would have needed to be an emergency before I ate it!
 

hannahb

Active member
I second Leclused and Pete's suggestions.

In my opinion it's important to carry a knife on SRT trips, even if it's only used for slicing cheese. I hope never to have to use it but even for cutting hair/beard out of a descender it could save you a lot of pain and faff as long as you could see what you were doing :)

Sometimes I carry a dangly bag (small personal tackle sack) on my belt, and sometimes I don't. It depends if there's room in other tacklesacks, in which case I'll put things in those, or if I think a small bag will really get in the way.

If I'm taking my dangly bag I'll stuff most things in there. Otherwise, I'll shove them in my oversuit & undersuit pockets and down the front of my suits. I wear a belt so this works even if I'm not wearing my harness.

I carry some things on cord round my neck (spare light, knife, whistle).

Not everyone chooses to carry a first aid kit, so if that's something you're keen on and no-one else is carrying one, I would put something small together inside a waterproof container or a tough drybag and either carry that in a dangly bag or find space for it in one of the big tackle sacks.

A friend carries a puffy jacket in a very thin dry bag, which is inside a tough dry bag, which he carries in a dangly bag. But a personal survival bag is a good call. It's a shame those thin clear ones are not so easy to get now - they fit into an oversuit pocket and were really good when you needed them.

In terms of food - definitely take something you do like! It's more than just calories. And don't be afraid to eat it. I eat much more these days on caving trips than I used to - it has taken me years to get round to that way of thinking, but I run out of "go" otherwise.

Please let us know how you get on :) Exciting!
 

hannahb

Active member
One more thought - the size of a personal tackle sack is, well, a personal choice. Mine is really small but recently I've caved with people who have the type with the shoulder strap or straps, which are a bit bigger, and I think they're better. They're no more or less annoying but you can easily fit an SRT kit in and some other stuff besides, which isn't really possible with my micro one. There's more stuff to snag, though, which is the down side.

Something to write with and something to write on are important in a first aid kit, should you find yourself needing to make notes about a patient. Someone recommended a sharpie and someone's chest once! That way, the person carrying a message can't forget it :D
 
My perhaps slightly controversial thought on first aid kits.
Your aim in dealing with an accident underground should be getting the casualty out, still breathing, with most of their blood still inside them.
A roll of insulation tape and some big safety pins might be of more use than a pretty first aid kit from Boots! ;)
Just my opinion.
 

Loki

Active member
A crepe bandage to go under the duct tape will prevent chemical burns from the adhesive.
Has anyone suggested taking the survey or description on the caving trip? In a sandwich bag or laminated.
What is this first srt trip going to be btw?
 

badger

Member
I think the question asked is way to wide to actually get a realistic answer, without knowing more details, which cave, duration, size of caver i.e some stay warm, other get colder very quickly. the leaders equipment I would hope also be relevant to whom they have in there group, if I know I have intermediates I would carry more kit than if I knew everyone was very experienced
a lot if very good answers, but if I was doing say hunters hole, goat church, my kit list would be reasonably minimalistic, as opposed to something in Yorkshire, longer, technically more difficult and quite often wet.
As for the suggestion of smoking in a cave cant think of anything more anti social other than severe BO, which could be a medical condition. you not going to be on my trips.
 

Fulk

Well-known member
Well LadyMud, you seem to have stirred up a bit of a hornets' nest here! All I can say is consider the options, choose what you think is fit – and have a really good time. Welcome to the world of caves & caving. (And take the above with a pinch of salt.)
 

Loki

Active member
Well LadyMud, you seem to have stirred up a bit of a hornets' nest here! All I can say is consider the options, choose what you think is fit – and have a really good time. Welcome to the world of caves & caving. (And take the above with a pinch of salt.)
One thing you’ll learn (if not already) is that most cavers have a dry wit, are usually joking if something sounds ridiculous, will always be helpful and want to pass on their hard earned experience. Learn from yours and others mistakes, we’ve all been there.

Oh something especially relevant to rope trips. If you think something looks odd or wrong in someone’s rigging say something as you might be right and after all everyone’s safety is at stake.
 

Leclused

Active member
I second Leclused and Pete's suggestions.

In my opinion it's important to carry a knife on SRT trips, even if it's only used for slicing cheese. I hope never to have to use it but even for cutting hair/beard out of a descender it could save you a lot of pain and faff as long as you could see what you were doing :)

Sometimes I carry a dangly bag (small personal tackle sack) on my belt, and sometimes I don't. It depends if there's room in other tacklesacks, in which case I'll put things in those, or if I think a small bag will really get in the way.

If I'm taking my dangly bag I'll stuff most things in there. Otherwise, I'll shove them in my oversuit & undersuit pockets and down the front of my suits. I wear a belt so this works even if I'm not wearing my harness.

I carry some things on cord round my neck (spare light, knife, whistle).

Not everyone chooses to carry a first aid kit, so if that's something you're keen on and no-one else is carrying one, I would put something small together inside a waterproof container or a tough drybag and either carry that in a dangly bag or find space for it in one of the big tackle sacks.

A friend carries a puffy jacket in a very thin dry bag, which is inside a tough dry bag, which he carries in a dangly bag. But a personal survival bag is a good call. It's a shame those thin clear ones are not so easy to get now - they fit into an oversuit pocket and were really good when you needed them.

In terms of food - definitely take something you do like! It's more than just calories. And don't be afraid to eat it. I eat much more these days on caving trips than I used to - it has taken me years to get round to that way of thinking, but I run out of "go" otherwise.

Please let us know how you get on :) Exciting!
As a personal tackle bag you could use a 15l bag of petzl

 
Oh something especially relevant to rope trips. If you think something looks odd or wrong in someone’s rigging say something as you might be right and after all everyone’s safety is at stake.
I would agree with this.
It is everyone's job to check rigging and climbing gear.
If it does not look right, or if you don't understand please, please ask.
I would go as far as to say, if the leader will not explain, then you have the wrong leader! But, in my experience people are usually quite willing to talk.
 

kay

Active member
Kendal Mintcake
The only time I carried Kendal Mint Cake I noticed the stream I was crawling in developed a fine minty smell.

Car key needs to be in a waterproof bag and to be fastened to your person. Unless you are happy to secrete it somewhere outside.
 

Roger W

Well-known member
The only time I carried Kendal Mint Cake I noticed the stream I was crawling in developed a fine minty smell.

Car key needs to be in a waterproof bag and to be fastened to your person. Unless you are happy to secrete it somewhere outside.

Ah, yes - Kendal Mint Cake needs to be carried in a waterproof bag, too. :)

Good point about the car keys - they mostly seem to be electronic thingies these days, and need to be protected from the water.

I still tend to think of them as those serrated strips of metal that you used to stick in the slot by the door handle and twist...
 

pwhole

Well-known member
Put the key up inside the front wheel-well, where it can be then knocked inside the bodywork upon attempting to retrieve it, whilst your mates are all getting changed in the rain at Knotlow, and after the old barn's been sealed. Alternatively, put it behind 'that loose stone' in the drystone wall in the Mandale Sough tail, whilst your mates are all getting changed in the rain, etc. etc. Giving it to me is probably the safest option ;)
 

LadyMud

Member
Just back from a lovely visit to Long Churn Cave, even though I only managed the first part of the trip.

Unfortunately, one welly came off while I was struggling up a little waterfall, and is now lying at the bottom of Dr Bannister's Handbasin. (If it ever emerges, please let me know. I don't actually want it back, but I can send you the other boot.)

So yes, I'm pathetic at climbing, and yes, I shouldn't tuck my oversuit into my wellies . . . BUT I really enjoyed myself, and can't wait for the next trip (in my new smaller wellies).
 
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