What's This ??

spikey

New member
Please pardon my ignorance, but what exactly are these features ?? 

Are they natural solution or t'owd man-made ?  :confused:

In either case, are they worth a poke ?

(BTW, between Chelmorton and Flagg)

1324627530_853fe85922.jpg
 

shotlighter

Active member
Old workings on lead rakes - you're obviously a stranger to the Peak, they're very common features.
Some are "explorable" (with permission of the land or mineral rights owner in most cases) while others may be completely run in.
 

spikey

New member
I live in the Peak District, and have done for 12 years  :-[

I have developed something of a fascination with the "blank" areas of Derbyshire, particularly the patch between the Wye Valley and the upper Dove Valley. I am convinced that there must be something under here, especially the large, Chelmorton basin at the head of Deepdale.

I am not aware of any great hydrological work having been done here, but the volume of water rising in the Wye Valley after heavy rain, is quite inspiring.

Having said that, if any (postulated) systems are as immature as those 3 or 4 miles away at Stanley Moor, then I could be barking up completely the wrong tree.
 

shotlighter

Active member
I see, you're looking from a purely cave, rather than a cave/mine perspective.
From the mine point of view (& you were questioning mine related features) the most interesting thing below Flagg Moor & with its sough in Deepdale is of course Hubberdale Pipe. Look it up in Caves of Derbys.
Having said that, there is a huge amount of (big) old mine shafts in the area which are largely unexplored due to past access problems.
This is not to say that a properly insured, experienced, tactful, patient & courteous person may not be successful now.
 

AndyF

New member
You beat me to it, Hubberdale sough is the obvious target. I gather Hubberdale mines were accessed some years ago but  idont know any more....

As for natural, well possible but limestone does not equal caves - the relief does not favour the area, but who knows.

Well worthy of some research though...
 

shotlighter

Active member
Yeah that sough has got to be worth a decent go by some one! It's always fascinated me, but am afraid it'll be down to the next generation to push it. I'm getting too decrepit!!
Oh & busy with a sough elsewhere in the Peak.
 

shotlighter

Active member
Incidentally, the sough we're re driving now has lots of water worn "karst like" limestone in the spoil. Were the oud men driving through old "pre ice age" cave? Probably!
 

spikey

New member
You know what - I don't think we're discussing the same Deepdale.

I think Shotlighter and Andy are talking about the one to the SE of Taddington, whilst I am thinking more about the one which meets the Wye only about a mile downstram of Buxton, and trends in a SW direction until it splits around the bookstore at the Longnor junction with the Buxton-Leek road
 

nickwilliams

Well-known member
The road between Buxton and Ashbourne is the A515, not the A6. The A6 is the one from Bakewell to Buxton.

Nick.
 

Mrs Trellis

Well-known member
Surely the main problem with the limestone plateau is that the limestone is massive, horizontally bedded and there is no remnant gritsone capping to provide active surface streams.  As Water Icicle shows there is pre- Ice Ages(s) speleogenesis but remains choked with glacial debris.

Showing my ignorance (not for the first or last time  ;) - where does the water flowing through Crimbo swallet resurge?
 

AndyF

New member
spikey said:
You know what - I don't think we're discussing the same Deepdale.

I think Shotlighter and Andy are talking about the one to the SE of Taddington, whilst I am thinking more about the one which meets the Wye only about a mile downstram of Buxton, and trends in a SW direction until it splits around the bookstore at the Longnor junction with the Buxton-Leek road

Yes you are right, although some of the same comments apply in terms of relief and drainage.

Thirst House in your Deepdale was subject to debate on another thread - it's a glimpse into what could be around there, and there is certainly little surface drainage visible.

 

spikey

New member
nickwilliams said:
The road between Buxton and Ashbourne is the A515, not the A6. The A6 is the one from Bakewell to Buxton.

Nick.

Yup. You're absolutely right. And I drive for a living and probably use that road at least once a week.  :-[ 

Thats the problem with following a Tomtom around - you never look at the road numbers anymore.
 
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