Author Topic: Commercial caving  (Read 9246 times)

Offline Oceanrower

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Re: Commercial caving
« Reply #75 on: January 04, 2017, 12:16:22 am »
I'm still puzzled by how a finite resource can have a renewable source.  :shrug:


Offline aricooperdavis

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Re: Commercial caving
« Reply #76 on: January 04, 2017, 07:29:14 am »
I guess finite and renewable aren't as black and white as they seem. Most resources that are considered finite renew over time - oil, gas, and coal, whilst considered finite resources, are forming as we speak (just so slowly that it's no use to us). Helium treads a similar line, it's slowly reproduced by radioactive decay, but not as useful rates, so it is, in practice, a finite resource.

Offline Bob Smith

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Re: Commercial caving
« Reply #77 on: January 04, 2017, 10:07:13 am »
It's the differnce between resource and reserve

Reserve
"those quantities of (insert mineral of choice here) claimed to be commercially recoverable by application of development projects to known accumulations under defined conditions."

Resource
"quantities of (insert mineral of choice here) estimated, as of a given date, to be potentially recoverable from known accumulations, but the projects are not yet considered mature enough for commercial development due to one or more contingencies.

this is an over simplification, but give you an idea.

Offline Kenilworth

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Re: Commercial caving
« Reply #78 on: January 05, 2017, 01:30:16 am »
Haha, sorry Kenilworth I'm getting ahead of myself, I'll excercise a bit of patience!

I have posted my response to your points as a separate topic. Though I tried to cut it down to something readable, I'm afraid I've rambled again. And though I've disagreed with your conclusions, I am respectful of your position.

Offline owd git

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Re: Commercial caving
« Reply #79 on: January 05, 2017, 06:12:06 pm »
Yadda Yadda!
Try a posative input.
O.G.
Hen racer? 2000 world hen racing champion

Offline cooleycr

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Re: Commercial caving
« Reply #80 on: January 06, 2017, 12:21:45 pm »
The answer is to use the technology available to us and get all the caves re-surveyed and scanned and then block up all the entrances.
We can then get the 3-D cave surveys downloaded to our 3-D printers to make a model and 3-D video streams to our VR headsets then no-one would ever need to go caving again and thus no issues!  :-\
TSG

Offline adam

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Re: Commercial caving
« Reply #81 on: January 06, 2017, 04:53:50 pm »
Indeed, it would be perfectly possible to create a replica cave Lascaux style including formations, water features, ropework and squeezes. This way people could get a close-to-nature caving experience without doing any damage to real caves. I could certainly be tempted to check out such an attraction, now that I'm retired.

Offline Roger W

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Re: Commercial caving
« Reply #82 on: January 06, 2017, 05:16:16 pm »
It could be an alternative occupation to digging, building your own artificial caves.  I'm sure some of those abandoned quarries with piles of stone and rubble just waiting to be cemented into place would be ideal. Horizontal passages could be built along the quarry floor and vertical pitches up the rock face.  Water could be fed in as required from a hosepipe, and I'm sure local farmers could be relied upon to provide cowsh** and dead sheep whenever needed.  Emergency exit hatches (suitably gated, of course) could be provided at intervals. A suitable Committee could be arranged to control access, with an easily replaceable padlock on the main entrance to accommodate those who don't totally agree with controlled access.  Loose rocks could be provided to topple without warning on those who enjoy that sort of excitement, and everyone could have a wonderful time.

But could it really be called caving...?

"That, of course, is the dangerous part about caves:  you don't know how far they go back, sometimes... or what is waiting for you inside."   JRR Tolkein: "The Hobbit"

Offline NewStuff

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Re: Commercial caving
« Reply #83 on: January 06, 2017, 05:52:09 pm »
Why are we still feeding the troll?

He wants attention, *and you're all giving him what he wants*.

I'll happily chat, debate and argue with people that ultimately have a genuine interest, no matter if they have opposing views (See Droid's post above). This guy does not have a genuine interest, and he's started multiple thread's that span from rambling to trolling.
Permission? Wassat den?

Online royfellows

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Re: Commercial caving
« Reply #84 on: January 06, 2017, 07:20:08 pm »
It could be an alternative occupation to digging, building your own artificial caves.  I'm sure some of those abandoned quarries with piles of stone and rubble just waiting to be cemented into place would be ideal. Horizontal passages could be built along the quarry floor and vertical pitches up the rock face.  Water could be fed in as required from a hosepipe, and I'm sure local farmers could be relied upon to provide cowsh** and dead sheep whenever needed.  Emergency exit hatches (suitably gated, of course) could be provided at intervals. A suitable Committee could be arranged to control access, with an easily replaceable padlock on the main entrance to accommodate those who don't totally agree with controlled access.  Loose rocks could be provided to topple without warning on those who enjoy that sort of excitement, and everyone could have a wonderful time.

But could it really be called caving...?

The padlock sounds authentic
 :-\
Glad NAMHO 2019 over.

Offline HardenClimber3

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Re: Commercial caving
« Reply #85 on: January 06, 2017, 09:32:34 pm »
There could be a range of different ways of securing entrances...from just a hinged door (grade 1) to something needing angle grinders and jacks (grade 5).....