Author Topic: Thailand Rescue  (Read 1343 times)

Offline braveduck

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Thailand Rescue
« on: December 28, 2018, 10:56:55 pm »
All involved in the Thailand rescue are in the new years Honours list .
Well deserved and a fantastic outcome  :clap2:

Offline martinr

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2018, 11:17:24 pm »
British divers who helped to rescue the members of a youth football team lost deep inside a cave complex in Thailand are among those recognised in gallantry awards released alongside the New Year honours list.

Richard Stanton, 56, a former firefighter, and John Volanthen, 47, an IT consultant, have been awarded the George medal, the second-highest civilian gallantry award.

They were the first divers to reach the 12 boys and their coach, who were trapped in the Tham Luang Nang Non cave complex for 18 days.

As the rescue became a race against time ahead of impending monsoon rains, they conducted reconnaissance dives upstream through flooded passages against strong currents and in poor visibility to locate the team marooned on a ledge above the water about 2.5 miles (4km) inside the complex.

Over the following days, both men participated in a number of dives to take supplies to the boys. “Each trip was carried out in exceedingly difficult physical conditions, with a high degree of personal risk,” the citations read. One Thai navy seal died during the attempt.

Two other divers involved in the rescue, Chris Jewell, 36, and Jason Mallinson, 50, receive Queen’s gallantry medals. Jewell, of the British Cave Rescue Council, said: “Behind every one of the cave divers being honoured is a supporting cast of family, friends, rescue volunteers and employers.”

Three other British divers, Joshua Bratchley, 27, an RAF meteorologist, Connor Roe, 26, a British army officer, and Vernon Unsworth, 63, who mapped the cave system, each receive an MBE. Unsworth said that after saving the boys, the honour “is the icing on the cake”.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/dec/28/thai-cave-rescue-british-divers-receive-gallantry-awards

Offline martinr

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2018, 11:24:46 pm »
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/civilian-gallantry-list-2019

Her Majesty The Queen is pleased to approve the following awards of the George Medal, the Queen’s Gallantry Medal and the Queen’s Commendation for Bravery. The names of those shown below will be published in The London Gazette.

George Medal

Richard STANTON, M.B.E.

Thai cave rescue, 26 June – 11 July 2018

Richard Stanton arrived in Thailand on 26 June at the request of the Thai authorities to help attempt the rescue of 12 junior footballers and their coach, who had been lost in the Tham Luang Nang Non cave complex in Chiang Rai Province since 23 June. Over the next three weeks he played a critical leading role in both the planning and execution of the rescue mission. His first significant contribution, on 28 June, was his reconnaissance dive upstream with John Volanthen through three completely flooded sections of passage to what later was designated as chamber 3. Here they assisted four Thai rescue workers who had been cut off by the rising water levels, which continued to rise.

Further exploration on 29 and 30 June had to be abandoned at chamber 3 as a result of strong water currents and poor visibility of around a metre. On 1 July, Volanthen and Stanton were able to travel 800 metres beyond chamber 3 to lay out guidelines; previous efforts by Thai Navy Seals had reached only 250 metres beyond chamber 3. The terrain was uneven and there were numerous blockages and obstructions to navigate. On 2 July, having reached 1500 metres beyond chamber 3, they surfaced to find the football team marooned on a ledge above the water.

Over the following days, Stanton participated in a number of dives to take supplies to the boys. Each trip was carried out in exceedingly difficult physical conditions, with a high degree of personal risk. The level of risk in reaching this far into the cave complex was underlined by the death on 6 July of a Thai Navy Seal, himself a professional diver, who was helping to supply oxygen to the children. Stanton then helped to lead formulation of a plan to rescue the team through diving. The Thai authorities preferred a non-diving option, but taking action was made more urgent as a result of forecast monsoon rains which might prevent any rescue effort or cause the boys to drown before a rescue could be attempted. As a result, a British-led plan was put into action between 8-10 July.

He was a leading member of thirteen divers and a group of Navy Seals who coordinated the rescue operation, bringing out the sedated boys one by one through to chamber 3 where an American medical team took over. The difficulty of the operation was heightened by the youth and physical condition of the children which required them to be sedated and immobilised, and then guided out by their diver through a route of multiple obstacles. Each journey took seven hours through the cave system and divers had to be taught to medically re-sedate the boys during the operation. The entire operation was carried out under the threat of monsoon rains and towards the end of the rescue, water levels began to rise, forcing a rapid exit by rescuers. In an operation of unprecedented complexity, all 13 of the trapped people were successfully rescued.

John VOLANTHEN

Thai cave rescue, 26 June – 11 July 2018

John Volanthen arrived in Thailand on 26 June at the request of the Thai authorities to help attempt the rescue of 12 junior footballers and their coach, who had been lost in the Tham Luang Nang Non cave complex in Chiang Rai Province since 23 June. His first significant contribution, on 28 June, was his reconnaissance dive upstream with John Volanthen through three completely flooded sections of passage to what later was designated as chamber 3. Here they assisted four Thai rescue workers who had been cut off by the rising water levels, which continued to rise.

Further exploration on 29 and 30 June had to be abandoned at chamber 3 as a result of strong water currents and poor visibility of around a metre. On 1 July, Volanthen and Stanton were able to travel 800 metres beyond chamber 3 to lay out guidelines; previous efforts by Thai Navy Seals had reached only 250 metres beyond chamber 3. The terrain was uneven and there were numerous blockages and obstructions to navigate. On 2 July, having reached 1500 metres beyond chamber 3, they surfaced to find the football team marooned on a ledge above the water.

Over the following days, Volanthen participated in a number of dives to take supplies to the boys. Each trip was carried out in exceedingly difficult physical conditions, with a high degree of personal risk. The level of risk in reaching this far into the cave complex was underlined by the death on 6 July of a Thai Navy Seal, himself a professional diver, who was helping to supply oxygen to the children. Volanthen then helped to lead formulation of a plan to rescue the team through diving. The Thai authorities preferred a non-diving option, but finalising a plan was made more urgent as a result of forecast monsoon rains which might prevent any rescue effort or cause the boys to drown before a rescue could be attempted. As a result, a British-led plan was put into action between 8-10 July.

He was a leading member of thirteen divers and a group of Navy Seals who coordinated the rescue operation, bringing out the sedated boys one by one through to chamber 3 where an American medical team took over. The difficulty of the operation was heightened by the youth and physical condition of the children which required them to be sedated and immobilised, and then guided out by their diver through a route of multiple obstacles. Each journey took seven hours through the cave system and divers had to be taught to medically re-sedate the boys during the operation. The entire operation was carried out under the threat of monsoon rains and towards the end of the rescue, water levels began to rise, forcing a rapid exit by rescuers. In an operation of unprecedented complexity, all 13 of the trapped people were successfully rescued, in addition to the four divers he rescued on 28 June.


Queen’s Gallantry Medal 

Christopher JEWELL

Thai cave rescue, 26 June – 11 July 2018

Chris Jewell arrived in Thailand on 5 July to help in the rescue of 12 junior footballers and their coach, who had been lost in the Tham Luang Nang Non cave complex in Chiang Rai Province since 23 June. The children had been located on 2 July. Jewell was part of a diving team who brought supplies through the cave system to the boys, monitored their health, helped to map the route and helped to plan a method of rescue.

Two days later, after careful planning and once the Thai authorities had agreed to a diving rescue, Jewell was one of four core recovery divers in the team, who worked over the next three days to extract the sedated boys from Chamber 9, where they were stranded, back to chamber 3 where they were handed over to a military medical team. He was responsible for bringing out three of the boys. During Jewell’s final rescue trip, he lost his grip on the dive line and spent four minutes adrift with one of the young boys before finding his way to safety. The rescue was completed successfully on 11 July.

Jason MALLINSON

Thai cave rescue, 26 June – 11 July 2018

Jason Mallinson arrived in Thailand on 5 July to help in the rescue of 12 junior footballers and their coach, who had been lost in the Tham Luang Nang Non cave complex in Chiang Rai Province since 23 June. The children had been located on 2 July. Mallinson was part of a diving team who brought supplies through the cave system to the boys, monitored their health, helped to map the route and helped to plan a method of rescue.

Two days later, after careful planning and once the Thai authorities had agreed to a diving rescue, Mallinson was one of four core recovery divers in the team, who worked over the next three days to extract the sedated boys from chamber 9, where they were stranded, back to chamber 3 where they were handed over to a military medical team. He was responsible for bringing out three boys; including the first and last boy to be rescued, plus their coach. During the last rescue, the child’s allotted full face mask did not fit properly, so Mallinson had to make the critical decision to use a different type of mask of lesser security, rather than leave the boy behind. This entailed a much slower and more cautious exit, and increased the risk and complexity of the process. The rescue was completed successfully on 11 July.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2018, 11:38:41 pm by martinr »

Online aricooperdavis

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2018, 11:47:32 pm »
Fantastic, absolutely well deserved!

Offline martinr

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2018, 11:55:14 pm »
MBEs are here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/767769/DSO_NY19_CH___BE_HMTQ.pdf

NEW YEAR 2019
DIPLOMATIC SERVICE AND OVERSEAS LIST
ORDER OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE

MBE

Joshua Brian BRATCHLEY, Volunteer Cave Diver. For services to cave diving overseas

Connor Stuart ROE , Volunteer Cave Diver. For services to cave diving overseas

Vernon Harry UNSWORTH , Volunteer Cave Diver. For services to cave diving overseas

« Last Edit: December 29, 2018, 12:08:15 am by martinr »

Offline Pitlamp

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2018, 06:55:12 am »
I woke up to this news on Radio 4 this morning; what a great way to start the day!

Congratulations to all concerned; I'm delighted your efforts are properly recognised.

Online yrammy

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2018, 09:06:40 am »
Excellent. All saved as PDFs for the library archive on the Thailand rescue.
Mary

Offline Flotsam

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2018, 10:24:14 am »
Richard Stanton and Johnathan Volanthen  awarded the George Cross. It's the highest award for civilian bravery, the civil equivalent of the Victoria Cross, a big deal indeed.

Offline martinr

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2018, 10:37:33 am »
Richard Stanton and Johnathan Volanthen  awarded the George Cross. It's the highest award for civilian bravery, the civil equivalent of the Victoria Cross, a big deal indeed.


Actually, they received the George Medal which according to wikipedia is "awarded for gallantry 'not in the face of the enemy' where the services were not so outstanding as to merit the George Cross."

The original warrant for the GM states "It is ordained that the [George] Medal shall be awarded only for acts of great bravery."
« Last Edit: December 29, 2018, 10:56:39 am by martinr »

Offline Badlad

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #9 on: December 29, 2018, 06:07:45 pm »
Our divers and rescuers certainly deserve a medal and probably a higher one than what they got.  Extra ordinary skills, giving themselves freely and at not an inconsiderable risk should be rewarded if the country is to award anyone at all. 

But a large part of the honours system stinks.  It is full of cronyism rewarding politicians, doing their job, for what?  Support of political factions or bought votes?  Also why reward someone for doing their job who are already getting very well paid for it.  A football manager for example.

So well done guys you deserve more.

Offline Scrappycaver

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2018, 10:00:40 pm »
Richard Stanton and Johnathan Volanthen  awarded the George Cross. It's the highest award for civilian bravery, the civil equivalent of the Victoria Cross, a big deal indeed.
Both well deserved ..legends!!

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Offline Scrappycaver

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2018, 10:08:53 pm »
Our divers and rescuers certainly deserve a medal and probably a higher one than what they got.  Extra ordinary skills, giving themselves freely and at not an inconsiderable risk should be rewarded if the country is to award anyone at all. 

But a large part of the honours system stinks.  It is full of cronyism rewarding politicians, doing their job, for what?  Support of political factions or bought votes?  Also why reward someone for doing their job who are already getting very well paid for it.  A football manager for example.

So well done guys you deserve more.
Full on..extraordinary!

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Offline martinr

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2018, 10:13:23 pm »
Richard Stanton and Johnathan Volanthen  awarded the George Cross. It's the highest award for civilian bravery, the civil equivalent of the Victoria Cross, a big deal indeed.
Both well deserved ..legends!!

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They may well deserve to get the George Cross in cavers' eyes. But what they actually received was the George Medal (which is not quite the civil equivalent of the Victoria Cross)  ;)
« Last Edit: December 29, 2018, 10:37:57 pm by martinr »

Offline Jopo

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2018, 11:46:38 pm »
Our divers and rescuers certainly deserve a medal and probably a higher one than what they got.  Extra ordinary skills, giving themselves freely and at not an inconsiderable risk should be rewarded if the country is to award anyone at all. 

But a large part of the honours system stinks.  It is full of cronyism rewarding politicians, doing their job, for what?  Support of political factions or bought votes?  Also why reward someone for doing their job who are already getting very well paid for it.  A football manager for example.

So well done guys you deserve more.
Full on..extraordinary!


I believe that most of the public will recognise the difference between political awards and those that are truly worthy.

As always the honors list includes many unsung heroes who are truly deserving of public recognition alongside the jobsworth and political arse lickers we all (I hope) feel cheapens the the system.


Those of us involved in cave rescue know that there has been (and will be) many instances of cave rescuers taking extraordinary personal risks to aid others, often unknown to themselves, totally unsung.

The unique set of circumstances brought forth the very best in cave rescuers from the UK (and cave rescuers from elsewhere). The recognition that has been shown to our guys at the apex should be shared by all those who participate, at whatever level, in cave rescue. We are (in my case were) all cogs that make it work.

Well done all, I am privileged to have been associated with most of you.

Jopo

Offline andrewmc

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Re: Thailand Rescue
« Reply #14 on: January 05, 2019, 01:31:50 pm »
They may well deserve to get the George Cross in cavers' eyes. But what they actually received was the George Medal (which is not quite the civil equivalent of the Victoria Cross)  ;)

There are (I think) only 18 people alive with the George Cross (some converted from other awards). It also comes with a £10,000 a year annuity...

It may not be the 'highest' award (which I suspect is reserved for those sorts of things where the recipient either believes it is likely they will die or do die, but carry on anyway) but it's still exceedingly difficult to get, and worthy of great respect.