Author Topic: What is Readybrek? (or what food adventures have you had in the last two weeks)  (Read 3921 times)

Online mikem

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Mate is definitely an acquired taste.

Online mikem

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Someone gave me some coca tea bags to try last year, from a branded supply - it was rubbish.
"At the next stop, Roddy managed to trade some of our Callard and Bowser for a supply of coca leaves from Presentacion. We followed his amused directions and masticated each leaf slowly, then tucked it into our cheeks before adding another to the cud. A pinch of bicarbonate of soda helped break down the leaves. Any expectation that the experience would be as remotely pleasurable as the name suggested was soon dashed. Rather it was a numbing feeling to the jaw and a sensation like being force-fed cabbage while under dental anesthetic, with a green slime constantly trying to escape from the side of one's mouth."
Hugh Thomson - The White Rock

They also had issues with their porridge.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2021, 08:15:08 am by mikem »

Offline Laurie

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Haggis last night.
MNRC

Offline Wardy

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I planted a lot of veg last year with seeds etc from a friend and others we had.

At the same time we were lucky to be able to watch a great family of squirrels doing some incredible acrobatics as I moved the bird feeders around - Each new location was simply a challenge to become overcome before they became relaxed and cool while emptying them with amazing speed.

At one point they slowed down on the feeders which I took to be a good thing.
A few days later I started to notice things down the garden that were amazingly similar to the spring onion bulbs.
After a few more days I noticed nearly as many of those spring onion bulb like things down the garden as the spring onion bulbs I had planted at the top of the garden.

Then as everything should have come up I realised the squirrels had acquired about 80% plus of everything I planted.

I never had the heart to chase them away as their ingenuity and talent for climbing never ceased to amaze me.
Would the sense of frustratingly therapeutic be appropriate! - Amazing balance, poise, technique and sheer cheek.

Offline Graigwen

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I planted a lot of veg last year with seeds etc from a friend and others we had.

At the same time we were lucky to be able to watch a great family of squirrels doing some incredible acrobatics as I moved the bird feeders around - Each new location was simply a challenge to become overcome before they became relaxed and cool while emptying them with amazing speed.

At one point they slowed down on the feeders which I took to be a good thing.
A few days later I started to notice things down the garden that were amazingly similar to the spring onion bulbs.
After a few more days I noticed nearly as many of those spring onion bulb like things down the garden as the spring onion bulbs I had planted at the top of the garden.

Then as everything should have come up I realised the squirrels had acquired about 80% plus of everything I planted.

I never had the heart to chase them away as their ingenuity and talent for climbing never ceased to amaze me.
Would the sense of frustratingly therapeutic be appropriate! - Amazing balance, poise, technique and sheer cheek.

What I find impressive about grey squirrels is their ability to chain together a sequence of actions to acheive a final result. The initial actions may not have any obvious connections to the final goal but the squirrels have the intellectual capacity to somehow make a mental picture of how a number of actions combine.

.

Online mikem

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& rats and mice can learn the most efficient route through a maze.

Offline pwhole

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What I find impressive about grey squirrels is their ability to chain together a sequence of actions to acheive a final result. The initial actions may not have any obvious connections to the final goal but the squirrels have the intellectual capacity to somehow make a mental picture of how a number of actions combine.


I think you just replaced the government ;)

Offline ZombieCake

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Traditionally breakfast is served with a Brain, an Athlete, a Basket case, a Princess, and a Criminal, and generally not forgotten about.

Offline AR

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Traditionally breakfast is served with a Brain, an Athlete, a Basket case, a Princess, and a Criminal, and generally not forgotten about.

Only if they club together! :lol:
Dirty old mines need love too....

Offline pwhole

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These are my luxury item of choice when I need a treat. Expensive, and only Waitrose seem to sell them, but they're often on offer. They're SO good - and they even have a 'TSG' label, haha. Aaaaggghhhhh.....I've got to have one now:

https://www.inesrosales.com/europe/sweet-olive-oil-tortas/original-olive-oil-torta/

Offline Dickie

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During lockdown we had virtual Friday night drinks at work. One week there was a competition to see who could put together the best quarantine cocktail - a Quarantini !
I made one including rice and bolognaise sauce, with the umbrella comprising a bit of spaghetti and toilet paper for the parasol. I called it Hoarder's Horror.

Amazin Razin rools OK!

Offline thehungrytroglobite

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Today, I made too much porridge for breakfast, so I left half of it in the pot. When it came to lunch time, I wanted something savoury to go with the porridge, so I fried some vegan shredded duck and put this on it along with sliced spring onions and soy sauce. It was actually very nice.

Offline PeteHall

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I fried some vegan shredded duck.
And there was me thinking that ducks were omnivorous...  :doubt:

Offline Pegasus

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Can't believe things people eat with porridge  :o

Offline pwhole

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That's because you keep thinking of it as a delicious meal, when it's actually more of an 'edible construction material'. Though I admit I am also totally lost on vegan duck. That's just quackers.

Offline Robert Scott

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Today, I made too much porridge for breakfast, so I left half of it in the pot. When it came to lunch time, I wanted something savoury to go with the porridge, so I fried some vegan shredded duck and put this on it along with sliced spring onions and soy sauce. It was actually very nice.
My paternal grandmother regularly made too much porridge, several days of it usually. The excess would be poured into a kitchen drawer, lined with pages from the Stornoway Gazette of course. As it set, it would be scored into portion sized chunks for use in subsequent days.
Annie Jane was a lovely woman.
Strangely, even after all these years, I'm not a fan of porridge.

Online tamarmole

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When I was an undergraduate at Dundee Uni in the mid 1980s a story was doing the rounds about a student at Aberdeen Uni  who had blown his most of his grant on a new hifi.  What little remained to him he spent on a sack of porridge oats which he promptly cooked up and stored in a drawer.  When he was hungry he would simply cut a chunk off and fry it up.  Several months later he was carted off with scurvy!

Offline cavemanmike

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A bit old school I know but you can't beat kellogs cornflakes

Offline ZombieCake

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Had one of those Nectar vouchers for a discount on a large raspberry trifle.  Got home and ate the lot in one go, saves cooking. It was very nice, although a bit commercial and not quite like home made with no sherry or angelica or glace cherries.
No porridge was harmed in the eating of the trifle. 

Offline Rachel

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I had a craving for something sweet, but found that there was nothing of that description in the house at all. I then had a moment of inspiration, popped a few frozen yorkshire puds in the air fryer and served them with golden syrup.

Online mikem

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Yorkshire pudding have traditionally been eaten either savoury or sweet.

Offline pwhole

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My gran used to make a large tray Yorkshire Pudding with chunks of Bramley apples in, a bit of sugar in the mix, and then a bit more sprinkled on top afterwards, served with custard - lovely.

Offline ditzy

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myself and Bri tried to make a bread and butter pudding the other day, it was delicious.

Offline Brains

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I had a craving for something sweet, but found that there was nothing of that description in the house at all. I then had a moment of inspiration, popped a few frozen Yorkshire puds in the air fryer and served them with golden syrup.
My late Dad used to say if there were any Yorkie puds left over when he was growing up they would have them with jam or syrup for dessert. When we were growing up, there were never any left over! Now I am grown up, there still arent any left over for dessert...  ;D

Offline Speleofish

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Which only goes to show, you don't make enough in the first place...

 

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