Oil

Laurie

Active member
If the price of a barrel of oil is the highest since 2014 why aren't the petrol stations charging 2014 prices?  :-\
 

Fjell

Member
Price of diesel is slightly higher than 2013, but lower in real terms. Refining capacity has fallen a lot, and I think there is a significant reluctance to take a loss this time round. In particular the supermarkets seem very reluctant to engage in a price war, they can?t afford it.

Retailers pay about 35-40p for petrol. They are prob making 15-20p profit at the moment. The rest is tax. Talk to your MP. Don?t forget the ?fuel escalator? has been frozen for a while, so if you vote for that then expect it to go well above ?2 a litre.

My biggest cost by far is depreciation on two cars, so I don't tend to get excited about fuel cost.

 

PeteHall

Moderator
Fjell said:
My biggest cost by far is depreciation on two cars, so I don't tend to get excited about fuel cost.
Easy to fix that. Don't drive a new car that depreciates.  (y)

Apparently the 2nd hand car market is booming, so an old banger is appreciating, while new stuff continues to depreciate.

The only trouble is that the ?100 banger of 10 years ago costs ?1,000 now and spare parts have gone up too (even at the breakers yard), so it's not as cheap as it was, but still a hell of a lot cheaper than buying new.

Classic cars meanwhile have gone through the roof and continue to climb.
 

ChrisJC

Active member
PeteHall said:
Easy to fix that. Don't drive a new car that depreciates.  (y)

Having got a Land Rover from 1963 and a Range Rover from 2015, I can advise that although the newer vehicle does depreciate, it is quite a lot more comfortable to drive than the old one. And that does have some value.

Chris.
 

Fjell

Member
We once had a Series II split-windscreen Landrover. It broke down on the exit ramp of the Santander ferry, which was chastening.

Significant work experience in nasty places thoroughly convinced me of the merits of Landcruisers and the mighty Hilux. I have owned a number. Unbreakable pretty much.
 

Cantclimbtom

Active member
If you had oodles of money (about ?35k for a really good one, then + maintenance costs) and wanted to invest in a classic that will never ever depreciate, try the Bristol Brigand (603 S3). Plus because it looks like the illegitimate offspring of a Ford Capri and a Skoda Estelle (with a whiff of Austin Princess) you could park it and absolutely no worry that anyone would key it or steal it etc. People will look and think "what is THAT? Run away run away" but not  "ooh look that's got a Chrysler 5.7L v8 engine with a rotomaster turbo"

Probably because the car only really appeals to the most discerning and most filthy rich collectors (despite not costing ludicrous amounts). In most conditions they can only get more expensive. Ignoring the gallons per mile fuel "economy"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_Type_603
 

tomferry

Active member
I can confirm that my 1987 Landrover does drink a extremely large amount of diesel and oil luckily the engine decided to blow up the other week so after it?s fixed hopefully it stops drinking the oil , I am sure the fuel will still be the same at the average of 18mpg it is very expensive, the bonus is the 18mpg gives you a massage the whole way their and home you have to have the head phones in your ears so you can think , I wonder if i can claim white finger of my boss even though it?s caused by the Landrover in my spare time ?  :-\
 

Cantclimbtom

Active member
If you need to drive to various different sites as part of your normal work (even if just to start work or collect other vehicles) then any whitefinger might be an employer's liability. Since they don't make new "real" landrovers any more perhaps you should ask your boss to pay for the nearest equivalent, which I believe would be a CSP 575.
If he bought you one of those I'd hope that would at least in part remedy your current injuries.  When you meet him to ask him or HR, don't forget to be wearing a foam neckbrace and walking with a crutch that day. It'd probably be cheaper for them to do that, than deal with some shyster claims direct lawyer.

https://www.goodwood.com/grr/road/news/2020/11/the-bowler-csp-575-is-a-brand-new-575ps-old-defender/
 

Fjell

Member
The new one:

https://ineosgrenadier.com/en/gb/

What I found with older Landrovers is that you could replace every part and it wouldn?t make it any more reliable, it would be instantly old and a bit crap. Possibly the Series III was the worst.
 

tomferry

Active member
Fjell said:
The new one:

https://ineosgrenadier.com/en/gb/

What I found with older Landrovers is that you could replace every part and it wouldn?t make it any more reliable, it would be instantly old and a bit crap. Possibly the Series III was the worst.

I have to disagree on that maybe you was putting them parts in wrong ? For example a wheel bearing without the racer ??  :confused:
 

tamarmole

Member
PeteHall said:
Fjell said:
My biggest cost by far is depreciation on two cars, so I don't tend to get excited about fuel cost.
Easy to fix that. Don't drive a new car that depreciates.  (y)

Apparently the 2nd hand car market is booming, so an old banger is appreciating, while new stuff continues to depreciate.

The only trouble is that the ?100 banger of 10 years ago costs ?1,000 now and spare parts have gone up too (even at the breakers yard), so it's not as cheap as it was, but still a hell of a lot cheaper than buying new.

Classic cars meanwhile have gone through the roof and continue to climb.

I've always been fan of the ?500 banger.  Last one was a Fiesta which we got 70,000 out of.  When it finally expired a few weeks ago I went to look for something similar only to find that the ?500 banger with a years MOT is a thing of the past, 2nd hand prices have risen significantly recently.  That said I did manage to pick up a fairly reasonable 56 plate Focus for just over a grand so budget motoring is still (just about) a thing.
 

tomferry

Active member
Just looked at getting heating oil for my house?kerosene ? I see it?s gone from 0.49p-?1.37!!  Per litre Be warned anyone who uses it ! I am definitely turning mine off cannot afford it .
 

royfellows

Active member
Talking of 'bangers,. I can well remember the downmarket sales forecourts with rows of vehicles up at about ?1295 that probably would not see out the next MOT. A thing of the past and good riddance.
Problem with cheap cars is if a major repair crops up that will cost more than the cars worth. So dump it and buy another, but then you could have same problem again in a few months.
My Skoda Octavia is a 2.0TDI and goes like a scalded cat but can do up to 70 mpg. Road tax is ?20 a year, apart from a grand for a new clutch when the slave cylinder went south it?s the cheapest car to run I have ever had.
 

Cantclimbtom

Active member
That's why Octavia were always popular with a lot of police forces

Tomferry said:
Just looked at getting heating oil for my house?kerosene ? I see it?s gone from 0.49p-?1.37!!  Per litre Be warned anyone who uses it ! I am definitely turning mine off cannot afford it .
I wanted to click Like to acknowledge the post, but it's not something I actually "Like"
 

Cantclimbtom

Active member
I've heard of someone mixing new oil - only in *Summer* with 50:50 mix because they got a drum that was surplus to requirements, but since it's undutied fuel I can't advise this on a public road. I've also heard used oil is way way cheaper but can contain acids which over time aren't good for the engine unless you remove with potassium hydroxide (or similar process) which the guy fails to mention in video below, but using new oil at about ?1.50 litre  (?30 for 20l drum) is already cheaper than average UK diesel at ?1.61 as prices are going up (https://www.rac.co.uk/drive/advice/fuel-watch/) and worth knowing in emergency anyway in case of some fuel buying panic. B10 diesel (10%) is pretty normal stuff and standard in France, I'd hazard a prediction that UK will follow suite, sooner rather than later

Skoda Octavia and used cooking oil B100 ;)
https://youtu.be/WNJH1rikujI
 

Ed

Member
Cantclimbtom said:
I've heard of someone mixing new oil - only in *Summer* with 50:50 mix because they got a drum that was surplus to requirements, but since it's undutied fuel I can't advise this on a public road. I've also heard used oil is way way cheaper but can contain acids which over time aren't good for the engine unless you remove with potassium hydroxide (or similar process) which the guy fails to mention in video below, but using new oil at about ?1.50 litre  (?30 for 20l drum) is already cheaper than average UK diesel at ?1.61 as prices are going up (https://www.rac.co.uk/drive/advice/fuel-watch/) and worth knowing in emergency anyway in case of some fuel buying panic. B10 diesel (10%) is pretty normal stuff and standard in France, I'd hazard a prediction that UK will follow suite, sooner rather than later

Skoda Octavia and used cooking oil B100 ;)
https://youtu.be/WNJH1rikujI


Notice the age of the car --- it doesn't work with a more modern common rail diesel engine> Not unless you have a seperate fuel system with heater etc. Even then its iffy - not all injector pumps with cope wit hthe viscosity.
 

Pitlamp

Well-known member
Tomferry said:
I can confirm that my 1987 Landrover does drink a extremely large amount of diesel and oil luckily the engine decided to blow up the other week so after it?s fixed hopefully it stops drinking the oil , I am sure the fuel will still be the same at the average of 18mpg it is very expensive, the bonus is the 18mpg gives you a massage the whole way their and home you have to have the head phones in your ears so you can think , I wonder if i can claim white finger of my boss even though it?s caused by the Landrover in my spare time ?  :-\

That fuel consumption sounds more like the petrol engined ones.

My 1963 Series 2A (standard 2.25 diesel) did 25 mpg, driven steadily (or even up to 27 on a good day). Starting it on a cold morning was always entertaining; all the houses along the street would vanish behind immense volumes of smoke. But it always did start and it never let me down once. (There was no acoustic insulation anywhere; just the aluminium bulkhead between you and what was essentially a tractor engiine. I confess to wearing ear defenders on longer journeys.)

The maximum speed I ever managed to get out of it was 60 miles an hour, flat out, downhill on the motorway. At least I think it was 60; the needle on the analogue speedometer was oscillating so wildly it was all a bit of a guess.

It was with real regret that I sold it on but it went to a very good home (another caver) and it's still trundling around Derbyshire. Not bad for a vehicle with a registration date 59 years ago.
 
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