Author Topic: My Favourite Photographs  (Read 7777 times)

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #150 on: May 04, 2019, 09:36:04 pm »
P3010016_edited-1 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P3010024 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P3010012 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090242 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090239 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Withyhill Cave, Mendip by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090235_edited-1 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090228 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090204 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Nicky by helmet available light. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090198 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090192_edited-1 - Copy by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090178 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090176 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Underwater. Withyhill by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090167 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Nicky by available light. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090156_edited-1 - Copy by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090150 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090149 - Copy by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090135 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090113 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090108 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090105 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090095 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090094 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090093 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090083_edited-1 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090072 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090065 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Live Composite Mode.Chamber beyond Jonathan's Ch. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090055 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P2090053 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Jonathan's Chamber by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Jonathan's Chamber. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr



Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #152 on: May 04, 2019, 09:54:31 pm »
777 To date. The last few posts contain, in my view , some real treats. Mostly Shatter and Withyhill which I feel have the best stal colour and variations in the whole of the UK.

Offline CavefestUK

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #153 on: May 04, 2019, 10:43:01 pm »
wow. there are some really great shots there. simply beautiful.  need i say any more.

Offline Laurie

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #154 on: May 05, 2019, 07:47:43 am »
What sort of time periods are represented by the stripes in the 'bacon rasher' curtains?
MNRC

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #155 on: May 05, 2019, 09:39:53 am »
What sort of time periods are represented by the stripes in the 'bacon rasher' curtains?

We need a lot more work to understand the development of the quarry caves. Possibly the caves were most active as conduits during the Hoxnian era.

Hoxnian interglacial – this lasted from about 410000 BP to 380000 BP. The climate warmed, and July temperatures were on average 18°C, which is three degrees warmer than today. With the warmer climate, trees and a wide range of animals returned. These included elephants, rhinos and lions (which were one and a half times bigger than modern African lions). Humans also came back to Britain, which we know from the items they left behind, such as burnt remains and tools.

21,000 years ago came our glacial maximum and only some 15,000 years ago the last periglacial era in the Mendip area.

Did you see that bit of tape possibly placed 50 years ago and now covered with stal ? This suggests that the caves are still active in stal formation. Many formations are pre periglacial and have been sheared off, cracked or displaced by blue ice within the permafrost. That from probably 21,000 to 15,000 years ago. The caves are horizontal and very near the surface. Possibly their upper reaches within the Black Rock Limestone already eroded away. The BRL is now mostly covered with periglacial head. Alternatively that kept the cave forming streams on the surface which it does now.
The caves proximity to the surface means that during wet periods there is a lot of drip in the caves. We saw that in filming WL Cave in January when the cave was relatively dry. A couple of months later it was very wet with drip and pools. So back to the question about the curtains. Most will be post Hoxnian and probably even post periglacial so formed from c.12,000 years ago and are still forming now.

Last Glacial Maximum – The Last Glacial Maximum (where the ice sheets were at their biggest) was around 21000 BP in Britain. Much of Britain was covered with a sheet of ice almost a mile thick, from Northern Ireland through the Midlands to the Wash in the east. Between the British and Scandinavian ice sheets was 70 miles of polar desert. Sea levels sank by 125-150m (from the present level), and the Channel retreated, leaving just a river with its tributaries the Thames, the Rhine and the Seine. The land immediately south of the ice became tundra, whipped by strong cold winds.

Incidentally these strong dry periglacial winds deposited the thick loess sediments we see at Vurley.

The main streamway in Withyhill contains little or no cryogenic material so is much younger than Shatter Cave. It is still active in wet weather. Glistening Pool Series ( the left hand branch ) contains much cryogenic stal so is contemporary with Shatter Cave whose water it captured. It seems reasonable to suggest that curtains in the active part of Withyhill ( a nice one at Elephants Trunk ) are amongst the most recent in both caves.

The last " Ice Age ".

    Younger Dryas (also known as the Loch Lomond phase) – Around about 13000 BP (or accurately c.10900BCE), the climate cooled quickly, dropping about 15°C in less than 30 years (and some people think within 10 years). With winter temperatures as low as those in the Last Glacial Maximum, ice sheets again came further south into central Scotland, and the land south of it turned to tundra. There was winter sea ice as far south as Spain. It is thought the Younger Dryas was caused by the Gulf Stream stopping, possibly as a result of large amounts of fresh melt water (from ice melting during the Windermere interstadial ) entering the sea and disrupting the current. We don’t know what effect this had on humans, but it is possible that humans still visited during summer months, perhaps following the herds of reindeer. In about 9600BCE, temperatures warmed as quickly as they had fallen (to a point where temperature was warmer and wetter than it is now) and Britain became more habitable again. This is when Britain entered the Holocene epoch.

The Holocene climate

The start of the Holocene was a period of rapid warming and gave the landscape the general shape that we see today (such as mountains, valleys, and erratics ). Isostatic uplift (where the land rises after the weight from all the ice is gone, rather like a stress ball that returns to its original shape after it has been squeezed) had the land returning to its full height, quickly at first and slowing over time.  Since the end of the last ice age, the land in Canada has risen by 900m, Scandinavia by 700m and eastern Scotland by 250m.

Sea levels also rose, eventually turning Britain back into an island.  Ireland finally became separated from mainland Britain c.9000BCE, but we’re not sure when the water rose so high that the swampy marshland between Britain and the Continent became impossible to cross. People used to think it happened somewhere between 7500BCE and 6500BCE, although new studies using marine life suggest this is too early. These studies say that it happened between 5800BCE and 5400BCE, and some people think that the Channel and the North Sea might not finally have joined until 3800BCE.  As late as the fifth millennium BCE some parts of Doggerland (a fertile and wooded stretch of land linking Britain to the Continent from Calais to Denmark) may have been above water, and there may have been other islands.  We also don’t know for sure whether the Channel appeared quickly, made by a rush of water like the one that possibly filled the Black Sea, or slowly.  One guess says that the waters came at 200 yards a year, which would take the Channel a little over 180 years to be made.  The last land connecting Britain with the continent would have been between East Anglia and the Low Countries .

The weather was at its best between 9000BCE and 5000BCE (which is known as the Holocene Optimum), when the temperature was warmer and wetter than today.  The ice age steppe (grassland) animals such as mammoth either died out or moved away as woodlands grew over huge parts of the country.  Forests grew further north than they do now and the Sahara was green and supported considerable life.  New species of animal, such as deer, horses, aurochs, wild pig, otter and beaver, followed the trees. This is the time when Britain began to be repopulated and Cunliffe says ‘these pioneers were the direct ancestors of the majority of the people living in the islands today’.

The relationship between Withyhill and Shatter Cave showing possible primary conduits and inter cave capture route.

PB270002 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Ultimately there is no fixed growth pattern in the curtains. Our climate is primarily responsible for that and as seen above has been much more variable than most folk realise. Happily we do seem to be in an era of sustained " stal building " in the quarry caves.

Bet you wished you never asked.

 
« Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 10:03:22 am by The Old Ruminator »

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #156 on: May 05, 2019, 10:02:26 am »
As a matter of interest Green Lake Chamber is a blocked at one end high level oxbow. The " lake " is perched and for a very long time has remained static with almost no change in level. The crystal growth across the base of the " lake " now acts as in impermeable barrier whilst some other similiar pools ( ie at The Icing Flakes ) come and goes.

P9030108 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P9030113 - Copy by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Withyhill 462 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Withyhill 464 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Withyhill 467 GLC by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Offline Maj

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #157 on: May 05, 2019, 01:21:07 pm »
What sort of time periods are represented by the stripes in the 'bacon rasher' curtains?

To summarise Laurie, there are too many variables to ascertain time periods.  :-\

But I guess it would be possible to analyse what has been captured in the calcite of the curtain when it formed and date by comparing with known environmental data. 

A scientific study project perhaps using some samples from small broken pieces of curtain such as those in Fernhill. I'm sure funding might be available from BCRA.  Any university students looking for a cave related project?   

Maj.
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Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #158 on: May 05, 2019, 02:02:57 pm »
Wanted.

Amenable young ladies for cave photography modeling. Apply Old Ruminator. Sunny Vale Retirement Home, Priddy, Somerset.

Withyhill 459 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P9030028_edited-1 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr


Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #160 on: May 05, 2019, 06:44:44 pm »
814 to here.

P1120002 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Entrance to Pickwick Passage, Reservoir Hole by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

In The Frozen Deep above Pickwick. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Nasty bits. Pickwick.

P1050237 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P1050205 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

I dont like that ! by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P1050183 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Upper Pickwick, Reservoir Hole by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Chris Milne in upper Pickwick Passage by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P1050182 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Skyfall. The boulder falling down here broke my arm.

Skyfall pitch. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

The Boulder Gate in Skyfall. Reservoir Hole. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Trapdoor Chamber.

Chris Milne in Trapdoor Chamber by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P1050132 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Helectites in Trapdoor Chamber by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Trapdoor Chamber, Skyfall. Reservoir Hole. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Trapdoor Chamber. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Any digging above Trapdoor Chamber in the choke above would damage the lovely coloured stal there. The dig has been abandoned.

Trapdoor Chamber by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Trapdoor at the back. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

High rift in Trapdoor Chamber by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Trapdoor Chamber by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

The Trapdoor, Reservoir Hole by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

False floor ledges in Trapdoor Chamber by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Chris Milne in The Frozen Deep. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Trapdoor Chamber. Reservoir Hole. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

The Trapdoor, Skyfall, Reservoir Hole. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Reservoir Hole. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Skyfall, Reservoir Hole. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Chris Milne and Peter Glanvill. Laddering TFD Reservoir Hole. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #161 on: May 05, 2019, 06:46:23 pm »
« Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 06:58:35 pm by The Old Ruminator »

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #162 on: May 06, 2019, 08:15:48 am »
Shall I go caving tomorrow ? Back seems better and off the Nurofen. Perhaps just a little trip ----

0oo me poor back.

Awkward entrance to Pickwick Series. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

The darn bats have pooed over The Icing Flakes plus on this occassion they were flooded.

PC290173 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Suggestive helectite number 43.

Withyhill by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Withyhill.

PC290095 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290090 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Withyhill by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290232 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290231 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290228 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290224_edited-1 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290223 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Withyhill by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Withyhill Cave by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290206_edited-1 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Naughty bats.

PC290202 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290197 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

A job for Mr O'Doc and his battery pressure washer.

PC290192 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290169 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290165 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290158 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

He will never see Green Lake Chamber and I rather doubt I will again as well.

Green Lake Grotto entry squeeze. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Not happy !

PC290149 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290145 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Hey ho gardening stuff to do and its a lovely day.


Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #163 on: May 06, 2019, 08:17:58 am »
Ah 868. Reckon I might just do it. ( but then what ? )  :shrug:

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #164 on: May 06, 2019, 12:57:19 pm »
Can you see what I did here ? Put a lamp under a hole in a false floor. Withyhill.

Withyhill by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Balch Aven Series. We put the oil drum in nearly 50 years ago. It was time to replace it but not easy on your own.

Balch oil drum replaced after 46 years. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P7070028 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P7070039 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

New Balch Entrance by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Summer at Fairy Cave Quarry.

Fairy Cave Quarry 2016 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Summer at Vurley.

P6280001 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

P6140030 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Radon dust ?

Blowing dust from shot hole at Vurley. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

How we propped up " Damocles ".

Damocles pillared. Vurley. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Damocles supported. Vurley. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Sod this. I am off on my own.

PC290138 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

The cutting edge.

PC290118 - Copy by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Thick and thin.

PC290114 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Crumbles.

PC290101 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Withyhill by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

No streaks Laurie.

Withyhill by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

More Withyhill !!

Withyhill by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Poor old CSS cottage.

Old Cerberus Cottage 2015 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Old Cerberus Cottage 2015 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC290006 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Washing day.

The washing is not dry yet. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Early Vurley.

PA170002 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

The Frozen Deep.


Phreatics. TFD by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

On the platform TFD. Reservoir Hole. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Smile., It's The Frozen Deep. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Enjoying Frozen Deep. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Reservoir. Pitch and platform. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Reservoir platform with selfie stick. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr






Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #165 on: May 06, 2019, 01:21:10 pm »
897.

Ooops forgot to downsize the Flickr image.

Cheddar Gorge.

Cheddar Gorge by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Timber Hole.

Timber Hole. Velvet Bottom by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Longwood Valley Sink.

Longwood Valley Sink. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

900 Images. :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

Above Reservoir Hole.

Car park. Reservoir Hole by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Butterflys

Butterflys at Vurley by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Totty Pot.

Totty Pot by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Totty Pot by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Vurley.

Verdant Vurley. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Vurley in Summer by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Orchids out now.

Near Vurley by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Cheddar.

Cheddar by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Ant at Vurley.

Ant on a plant. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Always remember there are wonderful things everywhere.

To bee or not to bee ? by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

March of the botryoidals. ( Trying to be differant. )

Botryoidals. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Heli's in the dark. Shater Cave. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

The Helectite Trail. Shatter Cave. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Lily pads. Shatter Cave by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Strange Landscapes.

Shatter Cave. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Shatter Cave. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Micro gours . Plug Hole Chamber by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Ice sheet. Shatter Cave. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Terminal chamber. Shatter Cave. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

If I posted 1,000 photos of just Shatter or Withyhill I could not do them justice. I can never tire of taking a camera there. Always something new to see. Other angles. Places long forgotten. Yet apart from the filming recently the caves are becoming a  quiet place with fewer visitors. Most Mendip clubs have their own leaders ( wardens ). To just go and be at one with nature and your camera. You dont even need a model. Just the wonderful formations are often enough. No doubt more will follow and I have to reach the 1,000.

918  :bow:

Offline tony from suffolk

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #166 on: May 06, 2019, 04:23:11 pm »
I remember the old CSS hut well. Why was it abandoned?
"Aim low, achieve your goals, avoid disappointment"

Offline mrodoc

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #167 on: May 06, 2019, 04:45:32 pm »
It fell down! The hut was a condemned building prior to being used by BCG and CSS. Once the CSS moved it just became a ruin. It was on land owned by the quarry.

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #168 on: May 06, 2019, 05:34:04 pm »
Basically the CSS bought land and built a new HQ at the top of the lane. The HQ is being extensively renovated after a burst pipe incident. Originally we ( the CSS ) shared the cottage with Border Caving Group run by Eric Cathrine. The clubs amalgamated and we knocked though the dividing wall to make one cottage. Dust from the quarry plant made the cottage unfit for habitation but it never bothered us much. Eric had army cadets stay there. They always left loads of tinned rations. Sadly it was probably a cadet trip that destroyed the Shatter helectites. You would never see novices there today. We built bunks and whiled away the time between digging in the quarry and at St Dunstans Well Cave. Portsmouth Poly cavers stayed there a lot. Pete Rose slept there while working in Shepton Mallet until a rat ran over him in his sleeping bag. He also managed to lock himself out nearly naked whilst having a pee. Had to break a windown to get back in. Happy days. In any case I was brought up in a cottage with no bath or flush toilet so it was much the same for me.


Nearing the end.

cerberus by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #169 on: May 06, 2019, 05:42:53 pm »
Other times but not my photos.

PC230046 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC230047 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

PC230048 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr


I remember Eric sitting there. Long gone now I suppose.

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #170 on: May 06, 2019, 05:45:50 pm »
This one is mine with a young Pete Rose . Maybe late 60's

221 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Offline tony from suffolk

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #171 on: May 06, 2019, 08:26:33 pm »
Thanks for the memories! I remember sitting outside, chatting to some folks and being a bit envious of such a salubrious establishment.
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Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #172 on: May 06, 2019, 08:53:26 pm »
Seeing things differently.


Selfie stick places camera carefully behind straws looking back at photographer.

Selfie stick photo. Shatter Cave. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Stick gives an overhead view of The Plughole, Shatter.

The Plug Hole Shatter by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Giant boulder high in the roof above The Plughole. Headlamp casts a shadow of the camera.

Big boulder in the sky. Plug Hole Chamber by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Another of The Plughole.

Plug Hole Chamber by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Reflection on the halves line.

Reflection. Shatter Cave by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

More crumble. Lovely orange with stalactite lemon dips.

Shatter Cave. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Into the light.

Shatter Cave. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Yummy porridge.

The Porridge Basin. Shatter Cave. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Pink candy.

Pink column in Shatter Cave. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Rice Crispies.

Islands. Shatter Cave. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Botryoidals.

Botryoidals, macro by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Micro crystals.

Micro crystals in calcite. Vurley. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Rummaging in Shatter 1972. A disappointing few metres of passage.

Shatter terminal choke 1972 by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Quaking House Cave.

Quaking House Cave by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

View from Mendip.

View SW from Mendip by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Hunters Lodge Sink.

Hunters Lodge Sink by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Prediction !  Before TFD was found. The Topless Aven Dig when everything looked hopeless.

Prophecy. Onward to the promised land. From my log. by Nicholas Chipchase, on Flickr

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #173 on: May 06, 2019, 08:54:52 pm »
Ooooooo 940. Wonder if I can find 60 more.

Offline Laurie

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Re: My Favourite Photographs
« Reply #174 on: May 07, 2019, 10:31:20 am »
Wow! Many thanks. I take a day off to change hospitals and come back to a hundred unpushed 'like' buttons.
Also thanks ever so much for the very readable geology lesson.
 :clap2:
MNRC