Author Topic: Uranium in the environment  (Read 2159 times)

Offline Bob Mehew

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Uranium in the environment
« on: December 09, 2019, 01:07:11 pm »
I have just had my attention drawn to a data set held by the BGS on Stream sediment geochemistry including uranium.  My interest comes from an offshoot of looking at radon arising from cave sediments.  Has any one got access to the BGS G-BASE data set and if so, could they give me an insight as to what is available?  It seems as if one has to pay BGS for sight of the data if one is not a NERC researcher.

Offline tom1

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Re: Uranium in the environment
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2019, 03:29:19 pm »
From what I can see the gridded data and point sampling locations (and what is available at each point) are available under an Open Government Licence (and are downloadable), and the survey point data should be available under a fee-free academic data licence on application. I work in academic research and this data is aligned with my research - PM me if you think I could help!


Offline Bob Mehew

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Re: Uranium in the environment
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2019, 08:27:11 pm »
Many thanks Mikem for the links, I had found most of them but the paper is of some interest.  However my interest is at a detailed level for which I am wondering if the BGS individual sampling results might be useful.  I am PMing tom1 whose comments sound just like what I am after.

Offline braveduck

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Re: Uranium in the environment
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2019, 11:47:35 pm »
The Boland shale/ Edale shale has nodules of :) Uranium Phosphate ,these wash into the Castleton caves ,hence the high Radon
levels. Also any gas produced by fracking would also contain Radon gas .They do not tell you that! 

Offline Bob Mehew

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Re: Uranium in the environment
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2019, 08:30:27 am »
The Boland shale/ Edale shale has nodules of :) Uranium Phosphate ,these wash into the Castleton caves ,hence the high Radon levels. 
Do you have a reference to a scientific paper for that?


Offline Pitlamp

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Re: Uranium in the environment
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2019, 08:56:38 am »
Just did a quick Google and came up with what I was hoping to find:

http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/4839/1/DX193594.pdf

Bit busy; not had time to read it, so I don't know whether this answers Bob's question or not. But the author, Rob Hyland, based his PhD on radon in caves. It may be worth delving into this resource because the abstract states: "Within limestone caves seven primary sources of radon were identified".

Anyway, I hope that helps.

Offline mikem

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Re: Uranium in the environment
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2019, 10:09:51 am »

Offline Bob Mehew

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Re: Uranium in the environment
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2019, 12:41:38 pm »
Thanks for the links Pitlamp & mikem.  They are of use.  Rob Hyland's thesis is central to the work on radon that I am doing and it has a small section (Ch 3.4.7) which is relevant to this topic.  G-BASE however was built up after Rob completed his work which is why I asked about it.  The Edale study requires some reading but on a quick scan I have already found a reference to braveduck's observation.

 

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