Author Topic: Tell us your flora and fauna tales for a chance to win a £100+ Exped Bag!!  (Read 3593 times)

Offline Mark

  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 1320
  • Eldon Pothole Club
A really weird experience when exploring Doolin River Cave (County Clare) occurred shortly before we  arrived at Fisherstreet Pot.

Whilst hands and knees crawling in deepish water, a shoal of Eels (100s of the buggers) swam past us at speed going upstream.

This was truly creepy with them all wriggling round us to get past.

On arriving at the Fisherstreet Pot entrance we tried our best to free climb out, but it was beyond our capabilities (we hadn't intended to do the through trip)

The only way out was back the way we came, which was like a horror movie, knowing that at some point the buggers would be coming back.

We didn't see them again, I don't know where they went maybe they went back while were were clowning around trying to climb out of Fisherstreet Pot

Online Pegasus

  • NCC
  • Administrator
  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 2909
Just loving the entries in this competition (studied biological sciences as Uni all those years ago, so finding your tales fascinating).  Thanks so much to everyone who has entered so far, do keep 'em coming  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Offline MJenkinson

  • forum star
  • ****
  • Posts: 555
I keep my tackle bags squished flat on a shelf at the back of the garage. One day, whilst pre-packing a load of rope for a trip (get me, all organised), I picked up a bag and thought "that smells funny". As usual I inserted my hand through the top and did the whole "flappy flap" to open up the bag.  As soon as I "flapped" once I knew I had a problem. The smell was overwhelming and as I opened the bag I realised I had now a very, very, very dead, aromatic ex-frog smeared all over my hand and wrist.

I immediately felt very bad, and also ran to my chemical shelf to liberally douse my hand in bleach to get rid of the smell. The tackle bag was deemed beyond rescue despite several baths in bleach.

As such I am one tackle sack down.


Offline lumenchild

  • addict
  • **
  • Posts: 153

Moel Fferna Slate mine, North Wales,

In 2016 I decided to take a trip to Wales with a few friends, Mike and Pete, In the heart of winter, The hillsides were beautifully covered in snow in Mid-January the sun was shining, It was a perfect day for a spot of mine exploration, It was the first trip out in the new year.

While having an explore, I found this growing inside the mine i have no idea what it is, maybe one of the members of this forum will know


always love life, remember you are made from stardust you where born to shine!

Offline AR

  • Black shadow
  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 1554
  • PDMHS, ATAC, ANHMS
I think the first photo may be a slime mould of some sort?
Dirty old mines need love too....

Offline Tangent_tracker

  • DCC
  • addict
  • **
  • Posts: 141
They are fascinating in their own right!
Olly.

Offline RobinGriffiths

  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 1291
Indeed. I believe they have been used for biological computers. Modern classification puts them with ameboids rather than moulds.

Online Pegasus

  • NCC
  • Administrator
  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 2909
Bump - ends at the weekend  ;D

Offline AR

  • Black shadow
  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 1554
  • PDMHS, ATAC, ANHMS
I'm sure I've told this tale on here before, but  might as well tell it again...

Close Encounters of the Furred Kind

A few years back, I was on one of the very occasional inspection visits to Yatestoop Sough which on this occasion had been organised by John Gunn. I'd been late getting to the meeting point, and so followed the rest of the party upstream but when I did catch up, it was mentioned that an otter had been seen heading up the sough in front of the group. I didn't think more of it at that point, and headed up the branch to the main shaft where I caught up with John. He was preparing to take some water samples and asked me to hold his tackle back open; the water at that point being thigh-deep and swift-flowing. While he was filling his bottles and I was holding the bag open, all of a sudden the otter erupted from where it had been hiding and shot between my legs. Whilst it is a privilege to see an otter that close, it's also quite a shock and I couldn't help but think they have very sharp teeth and a strong bite, and this one had passed very close to an extremely sensitive part of my anatomy...
Dirty old mines need love too....

Offline pwhole

  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 3146
  • TSG, DCA, PDMHS
    • Phil Wolstenholme website
Haha, I'd decided not to mention that episode. But now you have, it swam through my legs too as we were heading up the sough! Actually there were two of them, and they split up, one running off up the crosscut to Alice shaft. And they didn't even have headtorches. We found three 'nests' a long way up Magpie Sough too in 2018 that had to be from otters. A large trout swam through my legs right there on that occasion. The pic below was taken in Cromford Sough, 2015, on the last trip we did with Jon Humble.

Offline Caver Keith

  • Keith Edwards
  • forum star
  • ****
  • Posts: 532
  • The Dudley, SWCC
    • Dudley Caving Club
Cavers, Sheep and Wellies - 1

We've all heard the jokes about sheep being nervous when they see men in wellies. However after a trip to a well-known Yorkshire pot in 2011 it was us who were worried by the sheep!

https://youtu.be/5zdAUBf65SI?t=377

Offline Caver Keith

  • Keith Edwards
  • forum star
  • ****
  • Posts: 532
  • The Dudley, SWCC
    • Dudley Caving Club
Cavers, Sheep and Wellies - 2

The sheep theme was the inspiration for this scene from Hey, Hey, We're The Dudley

http://youtu.be/GYZcUyIy274?t=141

Offline PeteHall

  • Global Moderator
  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 2024
  • ChCC, GSS, SWCC, WCC, WCDG
Sorry, another repost...

Rather than admitting to being lazy, I'm going with the fact that I usually share any interesting cave wildlife stories on here anyway, so I'm just ahead of the game  :ang:

Reached the terminal sump in Charterhouse (England's deepest cave  ;) ) on Saturday, to find a fully grown, healthy looking frog  sitting by the sump pool! :o

I can't imagine that it would have survived getting washed through the whole cave, even if the stream flowed that way (which it doesn't), so I can only assume that it grew there.

How on Earth did it get enough to eat to grow to that size, and how long must it have been there?

And for good measure, here's a photo of a different underground frog, in an old dig of mine 🐸

Offline ditzy

  • The ditzy caving
  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 1302
my first srt trip was water icicle and we found a tiny froglet at the bottom. it was all in the spare rope and well hidden til it moved. we think it fell down the shaft

Offline ditzy

  • The ditzy caving
  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 1302
we had a trip in spiney level and it was full of mozzies i had to pull my buff over my face to keep them out of my face  :o it was horrible there were thousands of them

Offline ditzy

  • The ditzy caving
  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 1302
we had a trip in wapping with two of my friends, one of them hates spiders and the other thought she was being helpful by warning her not to get too close on the climb in /out
being told there were loads of cave spiders right by her head and long hair did not make her day :o

Offline Paul Marvin

  • forum star
  • ****
  • Posts: 674
  • Bronze, Silver & Gold Swimming Certificates, WGAS
Haha, I'd decided not to mention that episode. But now you have, it swam through my legs too as we were heading up the sough! Actually there were two of them, and they split up, one running off up the crosscut to Alice shaft. And they didn't even have headtorches. We found three 'nests' a long way up Magpie Sough too in 2018 that had to be from otters. A large trout swam through my legs right there on that occasion. The pic below was taken in Cromford Sough, 2015, on the last trip we did with Jon Humble.

We saw the same prints in Dale Mine .
I dont know where I am going, but will know where I am when I get there.

Offline Leclused

  • forum star
  • ****
  • Posts: 594
    • The Avalon Blog
During a solo prospecting dig (in 2013)  I had an encounter with a badger. The badger was kind enough to pass by a few times and I was able to grab my camera.



Sorry the text on it is in dutch.



Dagobert L'Ecluse (SC Avalon - Belgium)
http://www.scavalon.be
http://scavalon.blogspot.be

Offline Fulk

  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 4684
Many years ago we found a live-and-kicking sheep at the bottom of the first pitch of Sell Gill Holes (dry way). It appeared to be uninjured, is spite of its fall, so we set up a sheep-harness and hauled it out. Although we plonked it down several metres from the hole, the poor thing set off straight back to the hole, and this time plunged to its death!

Offline pwhole

  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 3146
  • TSG, DCA, PDMHS
    • Phil Wolstenholme website
Eweicide :)

Offline Fulk

  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 4684
Did it fall, or was it 'tipped'?

Offline lumenchild

  • addict
  • **
  • Posts: 153
Many years ago we found a live-and-kicking sheep at the bottom of the first pitch of Sell Gill Holes (dry way). It appeared to be uninjured, is spite of its fall, so we set up a sheep-harness and hauled it out. Although we plonked it down several metres from the hole, the poor thing set off straight back to the hole, and this time plunged to its death!

I'd of went straight back, I'd never pass up the idea of getting some free pre-tenderised mutton  :beer2:
always love life, remember you are made from stardust you where born to shine!

Offline Leclused

  • forum star
  • ****
  • Posts: 594
    • The Avalon Blog
During one of the 2019 Rigotte expeditions (France) one of the divers had an rather special encounter with a BLUE fresh water lobster.



Dagobert L'Ecluse (SC Avalon - Belgium)
http://www.scavalon.be
http://scavalon.blogspot.be

Offline mrodoc

  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 3216
    • Peter Glanvill's Webpage
On my one and only visit to Penrecca Mine in Devon I came across this spectacular fungal formation that had clearly been growing for a very long time indeed. How long I don't know but there is a part of the mine I have a photograph of called Fungus Corner (sadly not showing any fungus) suggesting it might have been growing for decades. I would be interested to know whether anybody can identify it and what would be its source of nourishment over such a long period.

Offline mrodoc

  • forum hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 3216
    • Peter Glanvill's Webpage
A really weird experience when exploring Doolin River Cave (County Clare) occurred shortly before we  arrived at Fisherstreet Pot.

Whilst hands and knees crawling in deepish water, a shoal of Eels (100s of the buggers) swam past us at speed going upstream.

This was truly creepy with them all wriggling round us to get past.

On arriving at the Fisherstreet Pot entrance we tried our best to free climb out, but it was beyond our capabilities (we hadn't intended to do the through trip)

The only way out was back the way we came, which was like a horror movie, knowing that at some point the buggers would be coming back.

We didn't see them again, I don't know where they went maybe they went back while were were clowning around trying to climb out of Fisherstreet Pot

This is fascinating. If they were elver sized they might have been migrating upstream from the submarine resurgence. If they were mature adults they might have entered the cave accidentally following the surface stream and been unable to exit via the resurgence so were coming back. I am sure eel researchers would be intrigued to hear this story. What does Graham Proudlove think?

 

Main Menu

Forum Home Help Search
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal