Author Topic: Good caving coffee table book for geologist friend?  (Read 542 times)

Offline nobrotson

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Good caving coffee table book for geologist friend?
« on: April 05, 2019, 05:39:10 pm »
I have a geologist friend who I want to give a book about caves and caving to as a present. He understands karst but not to a great extent. The kind of book I am after is one which has great photos in and is attractive to look at (coffee table style) but also contains enough scientific information that it is interesting to someone with doctoral training in geology. Not just scientific information about how caves form but also about biology etc, along with some information about the process of exploring cave systems, would be ideal. A book which covers a number of different karst regions from around the world (tropical, alpine, UK, non-limestone karst) would be ideal. Can anyone recommend anything? Or do I have to start writing one...
the man is mentally ill. I have seen him eat a plastic pie.

Offline zendog

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Offline nobrotson

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Re: Good caving coffee table book for geologist friend?
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2019, 08:12:19 pm »
I've been debating whether to get this book or possibly the Berger Book for him instead actually, since the only book that sort of matches what I described are 'Great Caves of the World' by TW, which I feel is not appropriate because it is a bit too basic in its language etc. Another possibility I considered was Cave and Karst of the Yorkshire Dales but I'm not sure if that would be overkill and also too specific for someone who isn't a UK caver/karst scientist to be interested in.
the man is mentally ill. I have seen him eat a plastic pie.

Offline Kenilworth

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Re: Good caving coffee table book for geologist friend?
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2019, 08:53:07 pm »
Karst Geology by Art Palmer is a beautiful book with a wide range. While there isn't much about exploration included, it illustrates that caves are complex and attractive and worth exploring. There is lots of accessible but in-depth science, lots of illustration. Of course, it's a US book but deals with caves all over the world.

Cave Minerals of the World, Hill and Forti, is also a science-rich book that is a joy to look at and read.

Online paul

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Re: Good caving coffee table book for geologist friend?
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2019, 09:54:07 pm »
Lechuguilla: Jewel of the Underground by Urs Widmer
I'm not a complete idiot: some parts are missing!

Online SamT

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Re: Good caving coffee table book for geologist friend?
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2019, 09:59:36 pm »

Good shout Paul!  I'd second that.

Offline Kenilworth

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Re: Good caving coffee table book for geologist friend?
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2019, 10:03:17 pm »
Lechuguilla: Jewel of the Underground by Urs Widmer

It can't be beat for pretty pictures. It really isn't about caves or caving at all though is it? I make sure to never show that book to friends who haven't been caving yet.

Offline JoW

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Re: Good caving coffee table book for geologist friend?
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2019, 06:28:45 pm »
Caves and karst of the Yorkshire Dales?

Offline cfmwh

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Re: Good caving coffee table book for geologist friend?
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2019, 06:40:22 pm »
Little bit dated now, but Caves by Tony (Waltham) has a fair bit of sciencey stuff and a lot of good photos in. Hardcover copy on Amazon atm for £6.50

Offline Badlad

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Re: Good caving coffee table book for geologist friend?
« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2019, 09:36:28 pm »
Caves and karst of the Yorkshire Dales?

I'll second that  :)