Author Topic: How times have changed...  (Read 4655 times)

Offline maxb727

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #50 on: January 20, 2020, 07:16:32 pm »
I don’t mind what colour things are but the more “female” coloured items are less like to be appropriated by the other half which is useful


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Offline Graigwen

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #51 on: January 20, 2020, 11:04:51 pm »
When I posted a link earlier in this thread to an advert for Lotts Chemistry sets, I was not surprised that it included the wording "For older boys". I was surprised that the cartoon like illustration contained what was clearly a girl.

I must admit that in the 50s and 60s I did not know any girl who played with a chemistry set, although that is probably distorted by the small number of girls I shared leisure activitiees with. Until the mid 60s there was a great deal of pressure on children to conform with stereotypes and any girl who strayed into male areas of interest was likely to be labelled a tomboy.

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Offline Tseralo

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #52 on: January 20, 2020, 11:47:49 pm »
I do wonder how any of you lot survived the 60s?!

Offline Tripod

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #53 on: January 21, 2020, 07:23:59 am »
I have often thought about the 60s (my generation) survival rate. Of course some did not survive intact, one local lad lost his arm to Sodium Chlorate and Sugar and some did not survive at all. Towards the end of school years there were motorbikes and then cars. Caving for me started in my teens with school friends. There were so many things to go wrong. Girls came as a possibly soft but not entirely safe option.   

Offline kay

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #54 on: January 21, 2020, 09:35:50 am »

I must admit that in the 50s and 60s I did not know any girl who played with a chemistry set, although that is probably distorted by the small number of girls I shared leisure activities with. Until the mid 60s there was a great deal of pressure on children to conform with stereotypes and any girl who strayed into male areas of interest was likely to be labelled a tomboy.

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Growing up in the 50s/60s I had a toy garage, a train set, a chemistry set and a kit with various lenses and construction bits to make things like microscopes and slide projectors. Though the chemistry set box had an illustration of a small boy doing an experiment watched by his admiring sister :-(

My best friend was similarly equipped, I don't know how much that was my influence, though.

Does anyone remember Bayco? Construction kit for buildings which had panels of "brickwork" kept in place by thin steel rods, like cocktail sticks but up to twice the length and more lethal. Would not be allowed in toys nowadays, nor would the tin cars and lorries with their sharp edges, nor a chemistry set without eye protection and with a neat little meths burner.


Offline Tripod

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #55 on: January 21, 2020, 10:43:36 am »
Despite my parents not being at all well off I managed to build up a complete set of Bayco. These items come up for sale quite regularly now in general/collectors auctions.

Offline Bob Smith

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #56 on: January 21, 2020, 12:50:00 pm »
I don’t mind what colour things are but the more “female” coloured items are less like to be appropriated by the other half which is useful


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I'm not sure anyone else would want to appropriate these...


Online PeteHall

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #57 on: January 21, 2020, 02:40:46 pm »
I do wonder how any of you lot survived the 60s?!
One of my dads school mates was killed when a "chemistry experiment" went off unexpectedly.
I'm sure he wouldn't have been the only one...
The distance between stupidity and genius is measured only by success.

Offline Graigwen

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #58 on: January 21, 2020, 11:30:54 pm »
I had a Bayko set. Not a big one, but enough windows to build from the little booklet of plans a little TB sanitorum with all windows along one side to let fresh air in.

They were indeed different times.

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Offline Fulk

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #59 on: January 22, 2020, 09:04:05 am »
Hmmm . . . I've just seen on e-bay that someone wants £90 for a Bayko No. 1 set – and I had a number 4. I wonder what that would fetch?

Offline kay

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #60 on: January 22, 2020, 09:58:26 am »
Hmmm . . . I've just seen on e-bay that someone wants £90 for a Bayko No. 1 set – and I had a number 4. I wonder what that would fetch?

I don't think I had a 4, but we had a shop which sold Bayko bits separately - had a big counter full of compartments with all the different pieces, like the best Bayco set you could imagine, and I can well remember the excitement of spending pocket money in there.

The frustration was that, no matter how many new pieces you bought, you always ran out of something just short of completion. I believe the same law applies to Meccano and Lego too. Even to Duplo and Playmobil - which brings back a memory from new parenthood, of constructing a 6ft high "DNA" model from duplo.

Offline mch

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #61 on: January 22, 2020, 11:20:48 am »
I had a Bayko building set, can't remember which number it was. I seem to recall that you could buy a set to upgrade to the next level.

On the health & safety issue, as a child I had many toy soldiers made of lead. When a few had broken I would place them in an old pan with a long handle and melt them over the open coal fire. I then poured the molten lead into the inner part of an Englands Glory matchbox (soaked in water so that it didn't immediately go up in flames) and when it cooled I had a small perfectly formed lead ingot. Needless to say I did this when my parents were not around!

Offline pwhole

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #62 on: January 22, 2020, 11:45:23 am »
There were a few other interesting outcomes of boys (and girls) with chemistry sets in the 1960s, and these three definitely survived  :smartass:


Online AR

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Re: How times have changed...
« Reply #63 on: January 22, 2020, 11:47:46 am »
I used to  melt bits of lead too, though I used the spirit lamp from my chemistry set and the lid of a tin of humbrol and was doing it in my bedroom! I also got given a baccy tin containing mercury by my older sister's boyfriend (it had apparently come out of a broken machine at work!) and I used to let that flow from hand to hand - some might say doing things like that in my teens explains a lot about me now.....
Dirty old mines need love too....

 

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