WHERE THE CAVES ARE - The Caving Regions > The Dales

Access to Alum Pot

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Rachel:
Went out last Fri night, hoping to get down Alum, but when we got to the end of Alum Pot Lane, there was a great big scary bull looking at us from the other side of the gate. We looked at him, he looked at us. Then he glared and made a noise that definitely meant 'don't even think of climbing over'. So we hotfooted it back to the car and went elsewhere. Has anyone else had a similar experience? I wouldn't have liked to be halfway up to Alum before I spotted this guy!

paul:

--- Quote from: "Rachel" ---Went out last Fri night, hoping to get down Alum, but when we got to the end of Alum Pot Lane, there was a great big scary bull looking at us from the other side of the gate. [snip] I wouldn't have liked to be halfway up to Alum before I spotted this guy!
--- End quote ---


Why - did he have SRT kit on? :lol:

mudmonkey:
I believe a bull descending Alum without SRT kit would be every bit as scary as one with. Though more than slightly quicker.

Dave H:
Not that it would have helped on a dark Friday night, but it's probably worth noting that if there are no cows in the field, a bull is usually no more likely to be more of a menace than curious cows (running up to within 6-7 metres before stopping, and then following you up the field)  Facing them and swinging you arms about will usually move any animals on a farm (except llamas and ostriches!)  If there are cows in the field with the bull – do not enter unless you really have to.

The breeds of cattle with dangerous bulls (Jerseys, Guernseys, Friesians) are not normally found in upland areas, and dangerous bulls will always be kept inside in strong pens, in order for the farmer to be able to control them.

But if you're not confident around cattle, it's always better to find an alternative cave.

Vice-President of Northants Young Farmers Clubs

Anon:

--- Quote ---Facing them and swinging you arms about will usually move any animals on a farm (except llamas and ostriches!) If there are cows in the field with the bull – do not enter unless you really have to.
--- End quote ---

Usually I find that technique works for me when I'm out on my own walking but NOT always as I found out walking in the forest of bowland once, a bunch of about a dozen cows saw me coming and as soon as I stepped on the stile they crowded round and wouldn't budge to let me off despite vast amounts of shouting, arm waving and god knows what else, I tried the gate and ran at it and they wouldn't shift (bloody stubborn is not the right word for these cows!) - so I hopped into next field and strolled down and watched them chase me along the wall lol.. (curious cows? more like stalker cows!!!)

I know the Alum path isn't a public right of way but did you pay for access as you should and if so did the farmer say anything regarding the bull?? Surely he would have said something along lines of it was closed that evening due to bull in field (which he is perfectly entitled to do) or at least informed you of the bull being in the field...
FYI.. The law regarding bulls on public rights of way is:
A bull of up to ten months old, yes can be kept in a field crossed by public paths. Bulls over ten months of a recognised dairy breed (Ayrshire, British Friesian, British Holstein, Dairy Shorthorn, Guernsey, Jersey and Kerry) are banned from fields crossed by public paths under all circumstances. All other bulls over ten months are banned unless accompanied by cows or heifers. If any bulls act in a way which endangers the public, an offence may be committed under health and safety legislation..

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