Author Topic: Maze caves  (Read 909 times)

Offline Speleofish

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Maze caves
« on: October 18, 2021, 10:01:25 am »
I've just been reading about Draughting Hole, the maze cave that's recently been discovered in Gretadale. Which made me wonder: why are maze caves so prevalent in the northern dales and apparently not further south, or in other caving areas?

Offline langcliffe

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2021, 10:36:56 am »
This is discussed on pages 131-132 of Caves and Karst of the Yorkshire Dales, Volume 1.

Offline RobinGriffiths

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2021, 01:26:22 pm »
I would guess it's something to do with thin limestone beds being constrained between impremeable beds in some way promoting dissolution along joints.

Online pwhole

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2021, 06:31:27 pm »
This is discussed on pages 131-132 of Caves and Karst of the Yorkshire Dales, Volume 1.

What if you only have Volume 2? I can't afford £15 just to find out this one factoid. Actually, thinking about it, Brightgate Cave near Snittertonin Derbyshire is a bit mazey, but no idea if it was as a result of the above, which I can't read :)

Offline Speleofish

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2021, 10:08:47 pm »
I have to agree. It's potentially useful to know where I can buy an answer, but I'm not convinced that I need to buy the book. Thoughts anyone?

Offline langcliffe

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2021, 10:24:01 pm »
This is discussed on pages 131-132 of Caves and Karst of the Yorkshire Dales, Volume 1.

What if you only have Volume 2? I can't afford £15 just to find out this one factoid. Actually, thinking about it, Brightgate Cave near Snittertonin Derbyshire is a bit mazey, but no idea if it was as a result of the above, which I can't read :)

Sorry I spoke.

Offline Andy Farrant

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2021, 11:15:20 pm »
Try reading the excellent paper on 'Britain's longest maze cave: Hudgill Burn Mine Caverns, Cumbria, UK' by John Dale et al., in Cave & Karst Science Vol 42(1), available on the BCRA website at:
https://bcra.org.uk/pub/candks/index.html?j=124
(click on the padlock link for details of how to acess this if you are not a member of BCRA)

or see
https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/2-Hypogenic-Caves-in-the-UK-Farrant-Harrison/569529725aea5d61050f34e19acbb96baa8e0279

£15 really isn't much for the wealth of information in Caves and Karst of the Yorkshire Dales, Volume 1. Most text books with this much information cost over £100...


Online pwhole

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2021, 11:33:21 pm »
Thanks Andy. Incidentally, I agree that £15 is a bargain, but I don't get to visit Yorkshire caves much, and Vol. 2 was much more useful in that regard - and I do have to watch the pennies these days. I just wish there was an equivalent volume for the Peak District, as I'd snap that up in an instant.

Offline Speleofish

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2021, 06:06:00 am »
Thank you Langcliffe and Andy. My objection to buying the book was based on it costing £30 (which was the first price I found online). £15 is much more digestible, so I will clearly have to get it. Meanwhile, I enjoyed Andy's paper very much - lots of information, some of which I understood - well worth a read.

Offline Loki

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2021, 07:47:16 am »
I've just been reading about Draughting Hole, the maze cave that's recently been discovered in Gretadale. Which made me wonder: why are maze caves so prevalent in the northern dales and apparently not further south, or in other caving areas?
Hi where we were you reading? Descent? I’m interested in that one too having heard of the discovery a while back.
Hidden Dips

Offline Speleofish

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #10 on: October 19, 2021, 07:53:29 am »
Yes, latest copy.

Online pwhole

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #11 on: October 19, 2021, 06:50:10 pm »
Thank you Langcliffe and Andy. My objection to buying the book was based on it costing £30 (which was the first price I found online). £15 is much more digestible, so I will clearly have to get it. Meanwhile, I enjoyed Andy's paper very much - lots of information, some of which I understood - well worth a read.

Where is the actual link to the Hypogenic Caves document on the webpage? I can't see one - can see all the figures etc., but no link to the actual paper?

Online AR

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2021, 08:39:22 pm »
It's not obvious, you have to go to one of the other links to find a place to get the pdf. I've downloaded the paper so I'll email it to you Phil.
Dirty old mines need love too....

Offline Speleofish

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Re: Maze caves
« Reply #13 on: October 20, 2021, 05:53:37 am »
I managed to register with the website, which gave me access to the whole paper (and presumably lots more, though I haven't tried yet). It was a slightly cumbersome process but I got there eventually. I think anyone can register (it has one box seeking academic affiliations but it's not a mandatory field).

 

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