Author Topic: Passage names  (Read 2795 times)

Offline Duck ditch

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Passage names
« on: April 05, 2020, 07:18:07 pm »
I enjoyed reading how the late breakfast series in long kin west got its name from wardy.  Does anybody else have any insights into named bits of caves.  Why is battle axe pitch in lost johns. named when all above is religious.  What about squashed chihuahua in king pot.

My contribution is when Pegasus came back after exploring new passage. She was eagerly asked what she had found. Instead of a full description of the passage she merely said “I have a wet belly”.   Not what her eager fellow explorers wanted to hear.

Offline Fulk

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2020, 07:41:03 pm »
One of my favourites is ‘Green and Smelly Passage’, which makes it sound like a really horrible, dismal place – more like a sewer than a cave. In fact, Green and Smelly Passage is a lovely bit of cave, and the name is totally misleading; evidently, when the cave was first being explored, cavers on the surface carried out a dye test, introducing fluorescein into a sinking stream, while others set off a smoke bomb in order to carry out a test of where a draughting entrance was likely to go. Underground, explorers in a new passage were suddenly assailed by choking acrid fumes, after which (or possibly before which) the water turned bright green – so those two attributes were temporary and short lived, and the passage has got a name that (unfortunately?) stuck.

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2020, 08:24:10 pm »
" Mr Trundle's I Scream Parlour ". Found this year and the " screamer " may be identified eventually. Trundling was a favourite practice along the dig in Reservoir Hole. ie rolling boulders back along 30m of the dig.

Offline mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2020, 09:22:06 pm »

Offline Fulk

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2020, 11:15:12 pm »
Here’s are two more (well, not passage names, but nevertheless cave feature names) from the Easegill System . . . both, sadly, now gone:

Platypus Junction
The Plumber’s Nightmare

The former was so-called from a strange piece of rock jutting out into the passage, which had a fancied resemblance to the bill of a duck-billed platypus, albeit on a grand scale, being probably 2–3 feet long and a foot or so wide; unfortunately it’s now broken (I believe you can still see it lying in the stream below where it used to be). So how the hell did it get broken? My best guess is that some twat stood on it and broke it off.

And as for the latter, this used to be an intricate conglomeration of stalactites/helictites, maybe just less than a foot high, that used to adorn Broadway in County Pot. The passage here is perhaps 6 feet high and 7–8 wide, with a false floor on the left-hand side (as you look downstream). The thing is, the false floor juts out some way into the passage and the formation was situated between the roof and the false floor, such that anyone would surmise that the formation would have been protected; but no, some pillock must have reached 2 or 3 feet into this area in order to deliberately break it.

Offline mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2020, 11:34:23 pm »
More here (I'm sure there are other threads):
https://ukcaving.com/board/index.php?topic=2776.0

Offline Judi Durber

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2020, 10:40:46 am »
NNoooo    :o     :( :( :( :(  It was such a great feature to show the children as a way-mark on a turning point.

Quote
Platypus Junction

The former was so-called from a strange piece of rock jutting out into the passage, which had a fancied resemblance to the bill of a duck-billed platypus, albeit on a grand scale, being probably 2–3 feet long and a foot or so wide; unfortunately it’s now broken (I believe you can still see it lying in the stream below where it used to be). So how the hell did it get broken? My best guess is that some twat stood on it and broke it off.
We must be willing to get rid of the life we've planned, so as to have the life waiting for us.

Offline Fulk

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2020, 10:56:51 am »
Afraid so, Judi; actually, it's been broken for some time now – probably several years. I suppose that if you were new to the system and walked past it, you wouldn't know that anything was amiss

Offline Roger W

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2020, 11:12:02 am »
Here’s are two more (well, not passage names, but nevertheless cave feature names) from the Easegill System . . . both, sadly, now gone:

Platypus Junction
The Plumber’s Nightmare

The former was so-called from a strange piece of rock jutting out into the passage, which had a fancied resemblance to the bill of a duck-billed platypus, albeit on a grand scale, being probably 2–3 feet long and a foot or so wide; unfortunately it’s now broken (I believe you can still see it lying in the stream below where it used to be). So how the hell did it get broken? My best guess is that some twat stood on it and broke it off.



I don't suppose it would be possible to fish the broken bit out of the stream and araldite it back in place?
"That, of course, is the dangerous part about caves:  you don't know how far they go back, sometimes... or what is waiting for you inside."   JRR Tolkein: "The Hobbit"

Offline Fulk

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2020, 11:21:58 am »
It's quite a substantial chunk of rock, Roger, so I don't think that araldite by itself would be strong enough. It would need holes drilling in the broken piece and the place where it came from, and some kind of rods to hold it together. Quite a tricky task.

Offline langcliffe

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2020, 11:22:45 am »
Here’s are two more (well, not passage names, but nevertheless cave feature names) from the Easegill System . . . both, sadly, now gone:

Platypus Junction
The Plumber’s Nightmare

The former was so-called from a strange piece of rock jutting out into the passage, which had a fancied resemblance to the bill of a duck-billed platypus, albeit on a grand scale, being probably 2–3 feet long and a foot or so wide; unfortunately it’s now broken (I believe you can still see it lying in the stream below where it used to be). So how the hell did it get broken? My best guess is that some twat stood on it and broke it off.



I don't suppose it would be possible to fish the broken bit out of the stream and araldite it back in place?

Possibly - but we have attempted to position the most likely candidates, and we cannot get a decent fit. As Fulk says, the damage was caused a long time ago, and I suspect that either the most likely candidate has been subjected to extensive weathering which has rounded off the point of fracture, or more likely,  the beak fractured into more than one fragment.

Offline Trogger

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2020, 07:59:31 pm »
Here's a picture of it in Oct 2004, if this works. It's the one on the left..!

Offline Trogger

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #12 on: April 06, 2020, 10:32:23 pm »
and here's a closer-up if you want to stick the platypus on again...

Offline oldboy

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2020, 12:19:17 pm »
An early picture from the Ron Bliss collection, RRCPC library, with a younger Jim Eyre.

Offline Trogger

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2020, 02:47:30 pm »
That's a much better picture than mine!  Taken from a different angle, but makes me wonder whether it had already suffered some damage when our picture was taken. Or whether our picture was really the platypus at all?! It was taken at Platypus Junction though.

Offline langcliffe

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2020, 03:04:00 pm »
That's a much better picture than mine!  Taken from a different angle, but makes me wonder whether it had already suffered some damage when our picture was taken. Or whether our picture was really the platypus at all?! It was taken at Platypus Junction though.

I didn't think your picture was of the Platypus, but I couldn't find a picture of the remnants of the actual one to back that view up. The above is it, but it is now a foot or so shorter.

Offline davel

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2020, 06:32:08 pm »
Does anyone know when it was broken?

I think it was complete in February 1969 when I first went there and I remember that viewed from end-on it widened out at the end like the bill of a platypus.

However, according to my log, it was broken when I next saw it in May 1972.

Dave


Offline Duck ditch

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2020, 10:06:08 pm »
Actually I know who the perpetrator is.  He is very remorseful of his action when he was young. He was a pretty wild and hard caver in his day.  A few years ago I gave him a platypus soft toy at a New Year’s Eve party.  He felt ashamed of his Actions on that day and wasn’t pleased to be reminded of the incident. His fellow cavers berated him at the time.  He never damaged a cave after this but he sure was a character above ground.  I was going to say early 70s.  Could easily have been 1971 to tie in with the last post.
Sad
I was hoping for amusing tales of cave passage naming
« Last Edit: April 07, 2020, 10:14:33 pm by Duck ditch »

Offline blackshiver

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2020, 10:42:59 pm »
To get this back on topic and to try to make people smile.....
“Dinosaur Penis Bone Chamber” in Jenga Pot.
While trying to dive and pump sump 1 in Jenga the North York Moors Caving Club and Yorkies were sat in the pub discussing what might lay beyond the sump. An imaginative prospective survey on the back of a beer mat included the as yet undiscovered chamber and imaginary passages that might lay beyond.
Wild Swimming with Prof Alice Roberts had just been on the telly and a discussion ensued as to how The Prof could be enticed into the (Rather Horrific) partly pumped passage. It was decided that the only way this was ever likely to happen would be to find a chamber that contained a Dinosaur Penis Bone.
Unfortunately when the sump broke - we only found a chamber.......
I have a plan so cunning you could pin a tail on it and call it a Weasel.

Offline mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2020, 10:54:47 pm »
Sorry to backtrack, but this was apparently 2012:

« Last Edit: April 08, 2020, 08:21:37 am by Badlad, Reason: change image size »

Offline blackshiver

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2020, 11:09:20 pm »
OK here is another one. Hudgill burn mine cavern has lots of Russian Themed names. The guys initially broke though a iron stained fin which crossed a passage and they called this The Iron Curtain. As the massive survey grew we needed to make sense of the place and the Russian theme continued, an area of heavy breakdown became Stalingrad. The big passage became the Trans Siberian Highway and a dug tight section became The Thin Red Line - named after an incident during the Crimean war which was being fought at the time Hudgill Burn mine was actually operating (1854).
I have a plan so cunning you could pin a tail on it and call it a Weasel.

Offline Duck ditch

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #21 on: April 07, 2020, 11:28:49 pm »
It’s the rock in front of formation not the formation

Offline mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #22 on: April 07, 2020, 11:51:27 pm »
Have to scroll across the picture (I know you can reduce size, but couldn't be bothered to work out how at this time of night - so if mod wants to do it...)

Offline mrodoc

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #23 on: April 08, 2020, 06:59:28 am »
Rob Harper has a penchant for wacky names. Simon Brooks and I surveyed Attila the Hun's Sardine Cannery in Wookey 20 some years ago.

Offline mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #24 on: April 08, 2020, 08:30:58 am »
Hypoxia?

Offline Badlad

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #25 on: April 08, 2020, 08:34:01 am »
Back to the Platypus - why is the assumption that it was broken by vandalism ("...some twat stood on it and broke it off").  We've had several incredible floods in the area over recent years. Flood water in parts of the system has been 30m high.  The power of this especially when draining down is unimaginable.  The rock is exposed and fractured.  Natural erosion could easily have played a part.

..and while we're on names, there's a Vandals passage somewhere, isn't there?

Offline Badlad

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #26 on: April 08, 2020, 08:37:55 am »
PS - does anyone else think the photographs of the Platypus above are not all of the same thing?  The first two look very different from the later two.

Offline langcliffe

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #27 on: April 08, 2020, 08:40:53 am »
Back to the Platypus - why is the assumption that it was broken by vandalism ("...some twat stood on it and broke it off").

Possibly, according to Duckditch who knew the perpetrator, because that was what happened.

Offline Badlad

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #28 on: April 08, 2020, 09:01:05 am »
Well, there seems to some confusion here taking all the above posts into account.

Offline mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #29 on: April 08, 2020, 09:30:54 am »
The first two pics are definitely of something else (as noted by Trogger & langcliffe in following posts), it's also possible that the perpetrator broke something different again (doesn't seem to have changed that much in other two pics, although they are from slightly different angles), but he could well have stood on it to see if there was anything higher up, which levered the already fractured end off...

Offline Badlad

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #30 on: April 08, 2020, 01:59:17 pm »
Apologies, skim read the thread and missed some of the crucial bits out.  Mystified by the photos, dates, etc.  Anyway digressing from names.

Long Kin West and Pugwash Passage, the site of a (near) recent breakthrough.  Pugwash passage was so called because a certain person was practically blinded in one eye while pushing this many years ago.  Although it actually turned out that it wasn't Captain Pugwash who had one eye - it was Cut-Throat Jake.  Hence after the breakthrough we entered Cut-Throat Chamber.  And then climbed the Black Pig Avens (Captain Pugwash's Ship).  Later after a pause we broke into the Hostile Environment.  Nothing to do with Pugwash and his mates but by then Windrush was in full swing in the media.

...and the relevance of this to the OP is that Pugwash is the upstream continuation of the Late Breakfast Series.  ;D

Offline oldboy

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #31 on: April 08, 2020, 09:48:19 pm »
Here’s are two more (well, not passage names, but nevertheless cave feature names) from the Easegill System . . . both, sadly, now gone:

Platypus Junction
The Plumber’s Nightmare

And another from the archives - Plummber's Nightmare

Offline Fulk

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #32 on: April 08, 2020, 10:45:35 pm »
More names:

The first three pitches of Strans Gill Pot are called Faith (Pitch), Hope (Pitch) and Charity (Pitch).

Now, I’ve not heard it straight from the guys who originally explored this pothole (Harry Long et al.), but from the nature of the pitches (P-1 and P-2 quite short, but tight and awkward, so you need faith in your capacity to get back up the first, you can only hope you’ll get back up the second, while P-3 is a big pitch of ca. 150 ft in a large rift).

I guess that they must be named after the bit in the Bible where St Paul says (I paraphrase):

I commend unto thee these three, Faith, Hope and Charity, and the greatest of these is Charity.

Offline Robert Scott

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #33 on: April 09, 2020, 06:58:25 am »
Yet more names.

Marilyn:  It wasn’t surveyed by the diggers but a different team within the club, so they were unaware of the names of the pitches as it was being dug.

The entrance is named “Seven Year Pitch”, the first underground pitch with boot-sized top is “Some Like It Not” followed by “Gentlemen prefer Blonde” then along the crawl to “Niagara” dropping into Disappointment Pot.

Unfortunately the first three pitches seemed to get rolled into one once they were rigged for SRT.

Offline Ian Ball

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #34 on: April 09, 2020, 12:40:55 pm »
That is very interesting.

I find it odd in the Dales when a cave isn't named as a pot or a cave.

Offline mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #35 on: April 09, 2020, 01:03:00 pm »
Boggart's roaring holes...

Offline langcliffe

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #36 on: April 09, 2020, 01:37:35 pm »
Boggart's roaring holes...

A nice piece of Victoriana... It was named by Balderstone: see "Ingleton Bygone and Present", page 45.

"We measured the depth through the later and found a stoppage at fifty-three feet ; then on entering the yawning aperture the process was repeated with a similar result, but on throwing stones downwards these appeared to go much further than the line, clinking onwards. At length there was a cessation of the clatter, but there began to creep upwards another dull sound, something between a roar and a growl in its intonation, appearing to come from a deep cavern far to the southwest— hence the name of Boggart's Roaring Hole that we have applied to this place, which heretofore was nameless. Prompted by the results obtained from mere sound, we cast the line further in to see if the obstruction in the way of the plummet could be avoided, with the astonishing result that the depth proved to be nearly three times the amount already obtained. The line was then sent down from the opening above and shaken past the obstacle when the depth was found to be one hundred and forty-five feet, with a slope above of fifteen more."
« Last Edit: April 09, 2020, 01:46:09 pm by langcliffe »

Offline blackshiver

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #37 on: April 09, 2020, 08:33:02 pm »
The “Drain Queens Highway” in Cliffe Force Cave was named after the discoverers wife who was a hydrologist.
I have a plan so cunning you could pin a tail on it and call it a Weasel.

Offline Duck ditch

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #38 on: April 11, 2020, 08:36:42 pm »
Here is what I am led to believe is the reasoning behind the naming of Ireby Fell Cavern by the BSA when they discovered it in 1949.

The first 2 pitches Ding and Dong are named after the phrase ‘dingdong’ often used in carry on films when a man sees a beautiful woman.
‘Cavers wish to return to the womb and see caving as a sexual act.  Female cavers dont exists. If they do they suffer from penis envy’.. Sigmund Freud et al.  So it is true. Please do not read on if you are offended.
So now that the cavers has penetrated the beautiful cave (ding dong).  They are now proud of there penis hence the name Bell pitch as in Bell end.
Pussy pitch is next, resembling a vagina and is quickly used.
You are now Well (pitch) into the cave.
A deviation from the way on is Glory Holes representing the several orifices that can be utilised.   Indeed North East Passage is a common phrase for the back passage.  Finally Duke Street is a reference to the Grand Old Duke of York, because he HAD 10,000 men.

Many cavers think the pitch and passage names are taken from a popular  and childish nursery rhyme, but the BSA were a sexually frustrated group of Cavers.  I think we all know what is more likely.
Don’t blame me, blame Freud and the lockdown.


Offline Fulk

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #39 on: April 11, 2020, 09:52:38 pm »
Hmmmmmmm . . . well, if penis envy exists, I think it’s a purely practical manifestation of what it must be like for a woman in a cave, in a small boat out on the ocean, up on a mountain, wherever, who wants to take a piss – and she sees how easy it is for a bloke (and fuck Fraud err, sorry, Freud).

Be that as it may, I wonder where the name ‘Lante Shop Cave’ came from.

Offline mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #40 on: April 11, 2020, 10:19:17 pm »
Unfortunately for the hypothesis, Carry on Nurse was released until 1959 ;)

Is lante shop an anagram?
https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4567386

Offline Duck ditch

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #41 on: April 12, 2020, 07:52:12 am »
I think Freuds sexual psychology is of course rubbish. I was trying to take the piss out of it. Every word of my post was meant to be funny. 
Having said that the BSA in 1939 were just as sexually frustrated as in 1949.  Lante Shop Cave was originally called Lanty Shop Cave.  You are correct it is an anagram of Lace Panty Oh.  Due to the entrance shape.

Offline Duck ditch

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #42 on: April 20, 2020, 08:04:35 pm »
Can you shed any light on why it was called Attila the Huns Sardine Cannery?
Just a flight of fancy or did you find an old tin of sardines in the dig.

Offline PeteHall

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #43 on: April 20, 2020, 08:34:18 pm »
Can you shed any light on why it was called Attila the Huns Sardine Cannery?
Just a flight of fancy or did you find an old tin of sardines in the dig.

I believe there is no significance to it at all, other than the fact that it is tight and a pretty awful (possibly awesome) bit of cave. Incidentally, when I helped Duncan Price re-survey this a few years ago, we were able to push the "end" by moving a couple of small rocks to a boulder slope, which ascended back to the main passage, allowing us to close the loop on the survey and avoid the crawl back out  ;D
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Offline Duncan Price

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #44 on: April 21, 2020, 09:16:18 am »
Can you shed any light on why it was called Attila the Huns Sardine Cannery?
Just a flight of fancy or did you find an old tin of sardines in the dig.

I believe there is no significance to it at all, other than the fact that it is tight and a pretty awful (possibly awesome) bit of cave. Incidentally, when I helped Duncan Price re-survey this a few years ago, we were able to push the "end" by moving a couple of small rocks to a boulder slope, which ascended back to the main passage, allowing us to close the loop on the survey and avoid the crawl back out  ;D

Here's the "official line" from "Who was Aveline anyway"

Quote
Attila the Hun's Sardine Cannery, Wookey Hole Cave - a passage above the lake in Wookey 20 explored in 1983 and named by Rob Harper. The bedding plane approach suggested the Sardine Cannery and Rob's fascination for ancient hordes supplied Attila the Hun.

It is effectively the lower end of an inclined bedding forming the Wookey 20 main passage divided from it by rocks.

In Wookey 22 there is an aven called the "Mongol Hordes Information Office"

Offline The Old Ruminator

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #45 on: April 22, 2020, 09:46:07 am »
Naming parts of a new cave is a complex procedure. I quite like the idea of a double meaning where the discovery time is linked to something topical and may also have a meaning relating to the area in question. In our case it sometimes lead to argument and inaction as we see at Vurley. ( I still dont know where Vurley originates )

The Frozen Deep epic took place on the 200th birth anniversary of the writer Charles Dickens. We ended up with -

Great Expectations. ( there were ).
Hard Times ( it was )
The Frozen Deep I came up with. A play performed by Dickens relating to the Franklin Expedition in the Arctic where all were lost. The relation to the cave was that the first thing we saw was a huge wall of stal that looked like ice. Later when cryogenic material was found in plenty there the name became even more relevant.

Resurrection also had two meanings. Old resurrected diggers found it and it continued the Easter story started by Willie Stanton at Golgotha .

The series was completed by Ascension and Heaven's Landing both descriptive of the area as well.

Skyfall could have been Chicken Licken Choke but became Skyfall as the film was on at the time and boulders fell from the sky.   ( My broken arm there ).

Pickwick Passage and Dingley Dell were also Dicken's references in Reservoir Hole.

La La Land was named after the film award fiasco which happened at the time. It also signified the many loose boulders there where there. It was better to sing la la la and pretend not to notice them.

WIShyou Were Here incorporated Willie Stanton's initials and signified the agonising wait for the rest of the team to return from Iceland.


Maidez in Vurley was the French term for Mayday as it was found on May the first.

We never got around to naming the four pitches as the survey remained incomplete.


As newsletter editor for Cerberus I named a lot of stuff at Fairy Cave Quarry. These included -

Withyhill and Hillwithy both essentially part of Withybrook - Hilliers streamway. A simple word reversal.

In St Dunsatns well I had -

Domestos Bend ( horrible u shaped duck )
The Buttocks. ( a tight squeeze )

In Withyhill.

Stal Shuffle
Fatbelly Rift. ( you have one if you can't walk through it - I can't now )
Green Lake Chamber
Jonathan's Chamber. My son was one when I found it.
We never named the big chamber at the end

Caves I named in the Quarry

Rumble Tumble Hole
Roses Rift
Culdesac Pot
Prices Purgatory ( as he was a slim youth then we pushed him down it ).

I was using the names to save the best for me. It never happened

In WL ( Whitaker Lavis ) we found Hammer and Chisel Rifts. The tools we used.

Whilst in house digging team jokes look fine they are often beyond the wit and understanding of others.

Naming caves or parts of caves after people is now considered to be rather unacceptable. Chipchase Chasm will never be seen.

Our new chamber at Fairy Cave Quarry had suggestions for Corvid Chamber relating to the pandemic and Jackdaws in the quarry. The feeling is that in time its something we won't want to be reminded of.


Offline mikem

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #46 on: April 22, 2020, 10:59:41 am »

Offline pwhole

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #47 on: April 22, 2020, 11:24:13 am »
I find it extremely difficult to name passages, even ones I've discovered. For someone with an extremely active imagination I find it almost impossible - not coming up with some words, that's the easy part - it's the philosophical conundrum of why those words, and to which part of the system they're applied, especially if there's no clear distinction between sections - often a transition between a passage and a chamber can be very gradual. And even more so if the place has demonstrably been occupied by previous tenants, i.e. miners. In our current project I think I've only named one passage and that was only as it was relatively confusing for folks which one I was talking about.

Maybe if it gets bigger, but I may still have to leave that job to someone else - though beer/drinking references are banned  :halo:

Offline Subpopulus Hibernia

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #48 on: April 22, 2020, 01:03:14 pm »
It is a dream of mine to locate a group of caves, name the series Every Hole's a Goal, and name every cave in it  after a famous goal - e.g.

Maradona v England Pot
Van Persie v Spain Hole
Roberto Carlos v France Cavern

etc.
Born Salzburg 1691. B.Phil. University of 's-Hertogenbosch 1718. Personal assistant to King Frederick of Liechtenstein, 1803-1857. Speaker of 35th Upper Silesian Parliament (fl. 1904-5). Owner/operator, Bridgend Underwear Factory, 1973-present.

Offline howardlimbert

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #49 on: May 13, 2020, 06:40:06 am »
My favourite is "duck with a bicycle pump up its arse". This is a passage was a low duck in Northern Vietnam cave. This fantastic name came from our team visiting a cafe in Vietnam where they saw a duck ( dead) with a person inflating it using a bicycle pump . Don't ask me why he was doing this but we did find it amusing hence the passage name. Mick Nunwick I believe came up with the name.

Offline Fjell

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #50 on: May 13, 2020, 08:20:45 am »
My favourite is "duck with a bicycle pump up its arse". This is a passage was a low duck in Northern Vietnam cave. This fantastic name came from our team visiting a cafe in Vietnam where they saw a duck ( dead) with a person inflating it using a bicycle pump . Don't ask me why he was doing this but we did find it amusing hence the passage name. Mick Nunwick I believe came up with the name.

You blow up a duck when making Peking Duck or similar to make the skin crispy. It allows the fat to melt away. I’ll see if it’s in the Mary Berry Aga cookbook, she’s hard core.

Offline Pitlamp

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #51 on: May 13, 2020, 03:41:50 pm »
Whilst strolling on the 'Boro today I found myself pondering on some of the names in the GG system. Can anyone remind me what the back story is behind the name "Anagram Crawl"?

Offline langcliffe

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #52 on: May 13, 2020, 03:47:54 pm »
Whilst strolling on the 'Boro today I found myself pondering on some of the names in the GG system. Can anyone remind me what the back story is behind the name "Anagram Crawl"?

Apparently the original explorers were trying to create a passage name out of their initials and failed, so took the easy way out.

Offline Pitlamp

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Re: Passage names
« Reply #53 on: May 13, 2020, 03:49:01 pm »
That was it - thanks Langcliffe.

 

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